The Devil’s Casino: Friendship, Betrayal, and the High Stakes Games Played Inside Lehman Brothers Lowest Price!

The Devil's Casino: Friendship, Betrayal, and the High Stakes Games Played Inside Lehman Brothers

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The Devil’s Casino: Friendship, Betrayal, and the High Stakes Games Played Inside Lehman Brothers Description:

They were the Rat Pack of Wall Street. Four close friends: one a decorated war hero, one an emotional hippie, and two regular guys with big hearts, big dreams, and noble aims. They were going to get rich on Wall Street. They were going to prove that men like them ? with zero financial training - could more than equal the Ivy-League-educated white shoe bankers who were the competition. They were going to create an institution for men like them — men who were hungry and untrained ? and they were going to win, but not at the cost of their souls.

In short, they were going to be the good guys of finance.

Under their watch, Lehman Brothers started to grow and became independent again in 1994. But something had gone wrong on the journey. The men slowly, perhaps inevitably, changed. As Lehman Brothers grew, so too did the cracks in and among the men who had rebuilt it.

Ward takes you inside Lehman’s highly charged offices. You’ll meet beloved leaders who were erased from the corporate history books, but who could have taken the firm in a very different direction had they not fallen victim to infighting and their own weaknesses. You will encounter an unlikely and almost unknown Marcus Brutus, who may have had more to do with Lehman?sfailings than anyone?including Dick Fuld, who has widely been considered the poster-child for the mistakes and greed of all bankers.

What Ward uncovers is that Lehman may have lost at the risky games of collateralized debt obligations, swaps, and leverage but that was just the end of a bigger story. “Little Lehman” was the Wall Street shop known to be forever fighting for its life and somehow succeeding. On Wall Street it was cheekily known as “the cat with nine lives.” But this cat pushed its luck too far — and died, the victim of men and women blinded by arrogance. Come inside The Devil’s Casino and see how good men lose their way, and see how a firm that rose with the glory and bravado of Icarus fell burning in flames not so much from a sun, but from a match lit from within.

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #238 in Books
  • Published on: 2010-03-22
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 296 pages

Features

  • ISBN13: 9780470540862
  • Condition: NEW
  • Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark.

Customer Reviews:

Irresponsible fictitious nonsense1
For anyone well acquainted with Lehman Brothers this volume is a comic book, filled not only with gratuitous pulp, but with a long list of outright, naked factual errors. I worked at Lehman for many years, was a Senior Vice President and feel that a deeply corrupt , and in Dick Fuld’s case, delusional management team misled it’s employees as well as the rest of the world. The recent revelation of the Repo 105 transactions that for a series of quarters masked Lehman’s actual deteriorated financial condition are perhaps the best examples of the misdeeds, but are by no means the only transgressions. Others were sufficiently numerous that they have already filled the pages of a number of books.

Unfortunately, this book has found an audience because we as a society gravitate toward the lewdest accounts of stories of greed and corruption that a journalist (and I use this term loosely) will muster. The true Lehman situation was sufficiently dramatic and mind bending to stand on its own to attract a large audience of the sort that likes to read about true crime. Certainly, a serious reader of business accounts would be equally attracted to the unvarnished truth.

After reading the nonsensical excerpt of this book that appeared on Vanity Fair (and shame on the editorial board of that magazine for printing it), there was no possibility that I would buy this book and put a cent in Ms Ward’s pocket, so I borrowed it from a friend. What I found was the expected inane and irresponsible fiction intended to appeal to a public hungry for scandal and willing to believe any written word. Indeed, it is with great cynicism that Ward has written this book, counting on the ignorance (as opposed to stupidity) of a ready public who have no access to the truth. To uncover even five or ten of the countless factual errors in this book would require some hours of research.

However, for me, a banker at Lehman for a number of years, the errors immediately recognized made the reading of this book nearly impossible.

Let me provide a few examples of Ms Wards sloppiness in slapping together this book of gossip. The Amazon page for this book includes a click to read Ward’s brief first chapter. She endeavors to set the scene for the book is describing a social gathering that included the might from the upper echelons of Lehman. She arranges these chess pieces like a cheater who rearranges the chess board while observers have looked away. I offer three simple factual errors. 1. She refers to a Lehman executive as head of the Investment Banking Committee. No such committee exists and the executive named, while senior, was not a core member of investment banking leadership. 2. She noted that Joe Gregory, Lehman’s president, dforced to resign after Lehman’s announcement of its first major loss was the oly senior executive at Lehman longer than Fuld. Fuld in fact arrived at Lehman at least a few years before Gregory. 3. When Lehman nearly collapsed but was acquired by the American Express conglomerate, she refers to this orgnaization and “American Express Shearson.” In fact, the acquiring company was called Shearson American Express and after the buying Lehman, Shearson Lehman American Express. She characterizes the acquisition by Shearson American Express as more or less part of a devious stepping stone for Fuld and Gregory to ultimately seize power. Ward references the classic book about Lehman’s first fall, Greed and Glory on Wall Street that notes Fuld voted against the Shearson American Express transaction. Indeed, head Ward read this book she would have gotten the name of the acquiring firm right as the correct one is mentioned many times. Far from welcoming the absorption of Lehman into the American Express financial supermarket, Fuld was, according to the earlier book, devastated by the vote to be acquired.

All of this i not say that Lehman’s management behaved ethically. Nor do I wish to whitewash the many other employees of the firm. But when we open the dover a book by a journalist we do so with the hope that we will be enlightened by careful and responsible research that reveals new truths and is filled with insight. Instead what we get is irresponsible fiction assembled to elicit shock and outrage and to line Ms Wards pockets.

Another book, Uncontrolled Risk, by Mark Ward is now available on Amazon. Sadly, it has not gained the same attention as Ms Ward’s book. However, it is a lucid, insightful account of what went wrong, assigning responsibility for the various elements of the Lehman debacle appropriately. It is not a rolicking read, but it is an honest, insightful and thought-provoking one filled with the intelligence and insight that is absent from Ward’s book.

Chris Pettit4
I spent 33 years at Lehman. As a VP and only a foot soldier, I witnessed from a distance much of what transpired at Lehman. I saw Dick, Chris, Joe, et al. “grow up” in the business. I saw and heard much of the yelling and screaming and phone tossing and banging on the desks over the years. Until, we became more civilized as we got down to the business of “one firm” and making money. While reading The Devil’s Casino I enjoyed being able to match the faces to most if not all of the characters. I am in no position to pass judgment on anyone, nevertheless it does not diminish my disappointment in the actions by many of those I knew so well.
I’d like to share two anecdotes about Chris Pettit. In one of his town hall meetings he said to the sales and trading team, and I’m paraphrasing, Come in each day write a few tickets, make some money and if your not being productive at 4:30 pm go home to your family get a good nights rest and come in the next morning ready to do it again. Don’t rush out an by the Ferrari and the home in the Hamptons just yet. Another and more personal anecdote occured during the 1987 stock market crash. As horrible as Oct 19, Black Monday, was for me, Tueday Oct 20, 1987 was horrific. I was responsible for funding the Money Market business. We were short prior to the crash in a rising interest environment. Until the Fed came in and provided liquidity forcing interest rates much lower. We had to scramble to cover our shorts and even got long the market. We needed to finance these positions when many repo customers and banks were running for the hills. Nevertheless we got the job done and successfully funded the firm. At 6 pm that evening as the dust was clearing I felt a hand on my shoulder and as I looked up there was Chris Pettit saying to me “good job”. Senior management should never have left the trading floors. The ivory tower did not suit them. I’m sure things would have been different. The book was a quick and fun read. Life goes on.

Entertaining, But…..3
I bought this book after watching the author on Imus In the Morning. He had read the book and raved about it several times on shows after the interview.

Not having any direct or indirect knowledge about Lehman Bros, I had no idea how accurate the author portrayed its downfall. I read the book because it promised to be a captivating and entertaining account of high powered people being brought down thanks to greed and hunger for power.

The first three quarters of the book were well written and easily comprehended by anyone, regardless of their familiarity with stocks, bonds, and all the rest. However, the last 50 or so pages were more obscure and far less interesting to the average reader. It almost seemed as if the author just wanted to pad the book’s length and/or was anxious to bring it to an end.

What really threw me was the author’s Note About the Sources at the end. She used an old tape recorder for her many interviews, and then had to re-interview some of the same people because of its faulty performance. She acknowledged even having “bungled” the operation of her replacement recorder.

This kind of sloppiness for a first time writer might be understandable, but Vicky Ward is not a beginning writer. Her credentials include investigative reporting, so you would think she would have been better prepared before setting off to write a major book on a major event.

She says she “had no idea of what it takes to write a book.” After digesting these caveats, I realized that what I had just read may or may not be totally accurate and frankly I felt cheated by all the hype this book received.

Amazon.com Review
They were the Rat Pack of Wall Street. Four close friends: one a decorated war hero, one an emotional hippie, and two regular guys with big hearts, big dreams, and noble aims. They were going to get rich on Wall Street. They were going to prove that men like them ? with zero financial training - could more than equal the Ivy-League-educated white shoe bankers who were the competition. They were going to create an institution for men like them — men who were hungry and untrained ? and they were going to win, but not at the cost of their souls.

In short, they were going to be the good guys of finance.

Under their watch, Lehman Brothers started to grow and became independent again in 1994. But something had gone wrong on the journey. The men slowly, perhaps inevitably, changed. As Lehman Brothers grew, so too did the cracks in and among the men who had rebuilt it.

Ward takes you inside Lehman’s highly charged offices. You’ll meet beloved leaders who were erased from the corporate history books, but who could have taken the firm in a very different direction had they not fallen victim to infighting and their own weaknesses. You will encounter an unlikely and almost unknown Marcus Brutus, who may have had more to do with Lehman?s failings than anyone?including Dick Fuld, who has widely been considered the poster-child for the mistakes and greed of all bankers.

What Ward uncovers is that Lehman may have lost at the risky games of collateralized debt obligations, swaps, and leverage but that was just the end of a bigger story. “Little Lehman” was the Wall Street shop known to be forever fighting for its life and somehow succeeding. On Wall Street it was cheekily known as “the cat with nine lives.” But this cat pushed its luck too far — and died, the victim of men and women blinded by arrogance. Come inside The Devil’s Casino and see how good men lose their way, and see how a firm that rose with the glory and bravado of Icarus fell burning in flames not so much from a sun, but from a match lit from within.

Amazon Exclusive: Q&A with Author Vicky Ward

The Devil’s Casino traces the history of the players and the company in a way that makes the fall of Lehman seem inevitable. Would you agree with that statement and why or why not?
Yes I would. I don’t think that the way Lehman was run was sustainable in the long-term. You cannot run a major securities firm without tolerating dissent or change at the top. Lehman’s “one firm” culture that made it so great when it was a tiny sub-division of a much larger entity became its nemesis when it was a stand-alone investment bank. Anyone who disagreed with Dick Fuld, or more importantly, the firm’s day-to-day manager Joe Gregory was either fired or quit. That is not the way Goldman Sachs is run, nor JP Morgan Chase. In those houses the CEOs seek out all sorts of different views in their senior executives. At Lehman anyone who argued about risk management was shoved aside. Eventually that position is not tenable.

Discuss some of the people you were able to talk to throughout the writing process. Do you have a favorite interview or experience during the process?
Well, I loved talking to Peter A. Cohen because he’s famous (to readers of Barbarians at the Gate) as being one of the most terrifying cigar-chomping bankers on The Street but I found him rather charming. He still carries his cigar. He just doesn’t smoke it anymore!

I also really enjoyed meeting Bob Steel, the former Treasury Undersecretary. I found him to be a very thoughtful judge of character who had a very large perspective not just on Wall Street but on the world. Hank Paulson too was really terrific. Very blunt, and actually very, very funny! When he told me that he used to tell Goldman Sachs bankers “listen, everyone hates you except your mother – and if you are lucky – your wife” it was hilarious! He was making the point that bankers become their own worst enemies if they are ostentatious – which he most certainly is not.

Some of the best interviews were off the record so I cannot say who they were with but I talked to some people so often that I felt my life would be dramatically different once the book was over: it would be very odd not to talk to them all the time.

I also did love Karin and Bradley Jack. Karin Jack has got to have the funniest sense of humor in a Wall Street wife I’ve ever heard – and I loved the fact that her ex-husband actually backed up everything she said (which was essentially how grim it was to be a Lehman wife!). They were a terrific pair.

And then there were just some fabulous people who really saw things straight and put me straight. John Cecil, Lehman’s former CFO, was painstakingly patient with me. I really owe him. And Tom Hill, the vice-chairman of Blackstone was a man I came to greatly admire. Even though Dick Fuld had shafted him back in 1993, he had a lot of sympathy for the Lehman people and I think really felt the tragedy of the firm’s collapse.

Share with us one of your key takeaways from your experience writing The Devil’s Casino.
Weirdly, that not all bankers are bad and that there are many shades of grey on Wall Street; it isn’t black and white. I think there was a lot of good and bravery in some of the protagonists of the book, and not all of them chose to take the Machiavellian path to ultimate power and riches, no matter what the risk or cost. Tom Tucker is an unsung hero: the former head of sales, who grew horrified at what they’d all turned into and gave back his bonus and set up a non-profit foundation for underprivileged children. Dick Fuld, too, actually was a very moral man, whose mistakes, I think were more unintentional, than intentional for the most part. This doesn’t excuse him. It just makes the story more interesting.

What are the implications for the future, post-Lehman and post-crash?
Well, to be honest, not good. I think the book is really a kind of morality-tale. It shows us how the best intentions go astray and how the will to acquire, to succeed, is in the end a force of human nature and is rarely tempered and overcome. I think the book shows that no matter what the “rules” or “regulations” are on the Street, clever or hungry bankers have always historically found a way around them. So I think that we will see history repeated – probably not tomorrow. But eventually – yes. Doesn’t history always get repeated? Isn’t that the irony of humanity?

Review
“Ward sheds light on the four childhood friends who planned to take the financial world by storm while keeping their heads on their shoulders, and how quickly the second part of the play fell by the wayside amidst a brutal corporate coup and bumbling mismanagement that brought the firm down. The Devil’s Casino serves as both an impressive work of investigative journalism and a cautionary tale of the culture surrounding American finance.” (The Daily Beast)

“Ward’s book is rich on details . . . when Ward connects the dots, the rough conclusion she comes up with is that fatal flaws of Fuld’s culture brought Lehman down.” (Reuters)

“A fascinating, deftly paced tale.” (Metro.co.uk)

Vanity Fair Contributing Editor Vicky Ward serves up a book about an investment bank that is a spicy, dishy dish . . . Ward builds a convincing case that duplicity and betrayal in the mid-’90s eventually led to the demise of Lehman Brothers.” (Bloomberg BusinessWeek)

“…The Devil’s Casino has everything readers might want to know about the personal foibles and shopping habits of key Lehman leaders and their wives…a fascinating read.” (Financial Times)

“Ward sheds light on the four childhood friends who planned to take the financial world by storm while keeping their heads on their shoulders, and how quickly the second part of the play fell by the wayside amidst a brutal corporate coup and bumbling mismanagement that brought the firm down. The Devil’s Casino serves as both an impressive work of investigative journalism and a cautionary tale of the culture surrounding American finance.” (The Daily Beast)

“Ward’s book is rich on details . . . when Ward connects the dots, the rough conclusion she comes up with is that fatal flaws of Fuld’s culture brought Lehman down.” (Reuters)

“A fascinating, deftly paced tale.” (Metro.co.uk)

Vanity Fair Contributing Editor Vicky Ward serves up a book about an investment bank that is a spicy, dishy dish . . . Ward builds a convincing case that duplicity and betrayal in the mid-’90s eventually led to the demise of Lehman Brothers.” (Bloomberg BusinessWeek)

“…The Devil’s Casino has everything readers might want to know about the personal foibles and shopping habits of key Lehman leaders and their wives…a fascinating read.” (Financial Times)

“What’s remarkable about this narrative is that Ward . . manages to humanize many of the central figures involved in the rise and fall of one of Wall Street’s largest firms, offering profound insight into the titans of finance whose recklessness, greed, and competitiveness brought the US economy to the brink of collapse. The story plays out like a Shakespearean tragedy (Ward even includes a “Cast of Characters’’) in which the very principles upon which the firm was built prove to be its undoing. . . The Devil’s Casino. offers a fascinating glimpse into the culture of one of the most powerful firms on Wall Street. One hopes that the history it chronicles will also serve as a cautionary tale for the financial industry’s still-uncertain future.”
—The Boston Globe

“In a terrific book Vicky Ward takes us into the heart of the denial machine. Hers is the story of Lehman Brothers, then Wall Street’s fourth largest investment bank, soon to be its biggest casualty. . . Ward takes us into the world of these bankers, and shows us the lives they were leading in the years before the crash. At first, they saw themselves as “good guys” – bankers who would not become blinded by greed. But then they began to see how much money could be made and their lifestyles changed. They did not seem to be their old selves any more. This is what Ward does so well: she shows us the world of private jets and helicopters, the women with personal shoppers and shelves full of unworn shoes. She shows us how it is that people, even though they are multi-millionaires, can still have an addict’s desperation for money.”
—The Guardian

In the fall of 2008, the 150-year-old financial institution Lehman Brothers spectacularly melted down. The liquefied remains then ignited, joining the worldwide conflagration that became the great recession that is now either over or not, depending on whom you talk to. In short order, a host of formerly rock-solid institutions showed cracks that ran all the way from their foundations to the aeries occupied by their greedy, ineffective senior management. Firms that once represented all that was trustworthy in our financial system teetered, then fell. Even insurance companies that were responsible for the welfare of others were revealed to be the oldest permanent floating craps game in New York.

“Vicky Ward’s “The Devil’s Casino” is an able new entrant into this crowded genre, and people who hate losers who are not their friends should enjoy it very much. It chronicles the sad and messy end of the House of Lehman in a relatively terse and fast-moving 270 pages, making it a mere social X-ray of a book by today’s standards of nonfiction heft, which often rivals the unsecured debt load of a failed bank. Ward carefully and skillfully tracks the last 25 or so years of the great, doomed enterprise, and her portrait of a business entity is often engaging, spicy and amusing. I particularly enjoyed the horror stories about those few, strategically challenged souls who had the temerity not to learn golf. Theirs was a demise that only outsiders to our fascist corporate golfing culture can appreciate. And the tick-tock of deals, fads, decisions and transactions that took place over a very long time can be exciting. The book also does a fine job of sketching several outlandishly banal individuals who rose to prominence in the firm and ultimately were responsible, each in a different way, for its demise.”
—The Washington Post

Review
“There is more juicy, salacious, icky stuff in this book than you can put in five books . . I kind of like all the icky stuff in it . . . all of the stuff going on with the wives and that. And sex and drugs. . . I’m begging you to read this. It reads like an intellectual Jackie Collins novel.”
Don Imus

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