Atlas Shrugged Review.

Atlas Shrugged

Atlas Shrugged Review.

Compare & Purchase Atlas Shrugged at Amazon by clicking here!

List Price: $25.00

Amazon Price: $16.50

Click Here To Purchase At Amazon!

Atlas Shrugged Description:

At last, Ayn Rand’s masterpiece is available to her millions of loyal readers in trade paperback.

With this acclaimed work and its immortal query, “Who is John Galt?”, Ayn Rand found the perfect artistic form to express her vision of existence. Atlas Shrugged made Rand not only one of the most popular novelists of the century, but one of its most influential thinkers.

Atlas Shrugged is the astounding story of a man who said that he would stop the motor of the world–and did. Tremendous in scope, breathtaking in its suspense, Atlas Shrugged stretches the boundaries further than any book you have ever read. It is a mystery, not about the murder of a man’s body, but about the murder–and rebirth–of man’s spirit.

* Atlas Shrugged is the “second most influential book for Americans today” after the Bible, according to a joint survey conducted by the Library of Congress and the Book of the Month Club

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #237 in Books
  • Published on: 1999-08-01
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 1200 pages

Features

  • ISBN13: 9780452011878
  • Condition: NEW
  • Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark.

Customer Reviews:

Read Philosophy, Do Not Fear It5
I want to say from the beginning that one does not need to agree with a philosophy to appreciate it. Obviously most of the critics and some of the supporters have never read this work. One need not approve of communism to give the Communist Manifesto a high rating but it is certainly a must read.

Ayn Rand’s philosophy is known as objectivism. It is essentially having a objective reason and purpose for every action you commit.

Atlas Shrugged is one of two major novels that outlines her entire philosophy while trying to show how it would be applied. That is why this book deserves a 5 star rating. Any philosopher can give generic ideas with no application. Rand puts it all on the line to show exactly how she means her philosophy to be interpreted.

The student of philosophy will be able to understand her philosophy quite clearly after reading this. If you agree with her philosophy you should encourage others to read this book. If this book is so clearly wrong then you should encourage others to read it so they will see how clearly wrong it is. Those that want it burned or object to others reading it know that she offers some very strong arguments for a position they clearly do not want to be true.

This book takes place probably around the 1950s. It is centered around the industrial sector of the U.S., the only government that has not become a People’s State. The main character in this book is Dagny Taggart. She is a no-nonsense VP of Operations for the largest railroad in the world. She is intelligent and is solely driven to keeping her RR as the best.

The times are dim and getting dimmer. In the beginning the country is in a recession of sorts and it is up to Taggart and others like her to save the country. There are two problems that are preventing her from doing this. One, the government seeks more and more control when it should be stepping away. Second, the men of industry are disappearing one by one just when they are critically needed. No one knows where they go off to.

In the sense of a novel this is a good one. It is suspenseful and intriguing. Everyone can identify with the characters in this book. Most of the antagonists have been left rather shallow. That is on purpose. They are supposed to represent certain elements of society. This book can get dry at times. One man has a 60 page speech that can seem a little preachy at times but is wholly necessary within the context of the novel.

Ayn Rand is perhaps the best known and widest read philosopher of the 20th century. If you have any interest in philosophy or economics then this is a must read. Don’t fear her teachings. An open mind is a dangerous thing to some people.

The most important thing to remember is not to take everything you read here as dogma. Think for yourself and apply whatever ideas make sense to you and ignore that which you don’t like. Think for yourself. I think Rand would object to anyone blindly following her philosophy without actually believing in it. No one says you can’t be charitable to others. Just make sure you do it of your own volition and not because it is expected of you or because you feel guilty.

A Refreshing Sense of Life5
I thought I’d be ambitious and write an actual review of the novel, rather than a review of Ayn Rand or her philosophy, Objectivism. Although I hold both in high regard, I think any disrespectful ad hominems need no response.

First let me tell you what this book is not. Atlas Shrugged is not a novel depicting ordinary people in ordinary situations. It is not here to tell you what is - it is here to tell you what could be and should be. That is why so many find the characters unbelievable, unreachable, even childish in their idealism.

As for the ideal itself, it is personified in the productive giants of (then) modern America. Dagny Taggart does railroads, Francisco D’Anconia does copper mines, Hank Rearden - steel. For centuries, men have asked what would happen if the working class went on strike; Miss Rand asks, what would happen if the men of industry went on strike.

What would happen if Atlas, a man whose shoulders held a world damning him a robber baron, shrugged? This is not a novel for the chronic skepticists who dismiss strong convictions as dogmatism, nor for the pessimists who proudly declare that they “grew out” of Miss Rand’s “naive optimism.”

For everyone else, though, I recommend Atlas Shrugged highly.

candid and unique piece of work5
An earlier reviewer struck an important vein when mentioning that academia and media have left this novel largely untouched, while it has continued to be read via word-of-mouth recommendations. Why? Rand is provocative; the novel engenders both deep respect and vitriolic opposition. Why?

To begin with, this is not an ordinarily structured novel; it is an overt statement of a philosophy. The plot, like many of those employed by Shakespeare, is not wholly original. (See an older book entitled “Secret of the League”). In any event, Rand uses the complex plot allegorically as a vehicle for describing her own unique philosophy and its consequences. Rand’s philosophy, and it is clear enough upon reading, is a synthesis of Aristotelianism with more modern “humanistic” concerns, in the greatest and original sense of the term. Rand ties Aristotle’s basic conceptions of logic to the workings of egoism and capitalism. She rejects Nietzschean irrationalism, Kantian ethics, and the kind of Pragmatism championed by Dewey. Her suggested replacement for these constructs is a body of thought which recognizes and responds to human needs and values, economic conditions, political necessities, and logical imperatives, even if incompletely at times. Oddly, her critics continue to tout her as little more than a “pop-philosopher”. On to her book.

Atlas Shrugged is a fountainhead of skilled dialogue and monologue. Francisco’s speech on “money” is insightful, and honest. Some prosaic passages, like Galt’s enormous speech near the novel’s end, could have used some editing. Nonetheless, such passages are meant to (and succeed in) conveying a rather thorough philosophy. Also adept at employing dialogue, Rand leaves cutting snippets and short verbal gems throughout the book. She distinguishes perceptively between ‘what people commonly say’ and ‘what those words often covertly are intended to mean.’ This making-bare is done through the frankness of her protagonists, some of which mere foils to reveal more probing insights. Those who would call her characters “shallow” may be correct if judging by contemporary literary standards which praise personal texture and ambiguity. Rand seems more interested in the kind of moral tale woven by the great Greek dramatists, in which characters are primarily vehicles of ideas.

It was once said that the purpose of philosophy is to start with something that everyone takes for granted, and to end with that which noone will believe. Rand uses Atlas Shrugged to achieve this kind of ideational journey. No shallow fanatic, her novel is a work is also a great psychological study of the motives of several common ideas, values, and ethical standards. She constructs in Atlas Shrugged a powerful critique of collectivism, that thought which says “We are our brother’s keepers.”

I suppose one reason for the novel’s continued popularity is that most readers are far too intelligent to be comforted by other kinds of books whose authors want them to think they are profound because they are difficult to grasp. Zservedah once called “clear prose the conceptual tool of conservativism.” Readers are probably tired of being asked to find beauty in the Emperor’s clothes, in works of art which are ugly, and in books which are pessimistic. Atlas Shrugged is unabashedly lucid and candid; it is refreshing to find such confident and clear writing in this age of self-doubt, relativism, and academic obscurity.

You will be a richer person for having read it.

Are some of Rand’s adherents sycophantic? Certainly. Yet if her philosophy were the kind of “cheap trash” critics claim it to be, why the vehemence of her opposition?

Review
A writer of great power. She has a subtle and ingenious mind and the capacity of writing brilliantly, beautifully, bitterly. — The New York Times

Review
A writer of great power. She has a subtle and ingenious mind and the capacity of writing brilliantly, beautifully, bitterly. (The New York Times)

About the Author
Ayn Rand’s first novel, We the Living, was published in 1936. With the publication of The Fountainhead in 1943, she achieved spectacular and enduring success. Through her novels and nonfiction writings, which express her unique philosophy, Objectivism, Rand maintains a lasting influence on popular thought.

Tags: , , ,

44 Responses to “Atlas Shrugged Review.”

  1. JOHN says:


    Buy Viagra

    Buy Quality Drugs Now!…

  2. Trevor says:

    sloping@abell.trees” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ!!…

  3. Dale says:

    supermachine@absurd.identities” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñýíêñ çà èíôó!!…

  4. Lonnie says:

    artful@crucially.obstinate” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ!!…

  5. John says:

    hermetic@bryans.agricultures” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    tnx for info!…

  6. Randall says:

    gait@backstairs.cozen” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñýíêñ çà èíôó!!…

  7. Wendell says:

    brand@paglieris.subjectivist” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    áëàãîäàðåí!!…

  8. Alex says:

    liquidating@swinging.durlach” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    tnx for info!!…

  9. claude says:

    latent@reprinted.rodent” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ çà èíôó….

  10. claude says:

    foes@producing.favor” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    tnx!…

  11. peter says:

    beautys@ascended.zaporogian” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    tnx for info!…

  12. rafael says:

    fadeout@sander.coudn” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïàñèáî çà èíôó….

  13. daniel says:

    appraisingly@representatives.startlingly” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñýíêñ çà èíôó!!…

  14. darryl says:

    minks@land.caroli” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    thank you!…

  15. matt says:

    mindedly@sunning.socially” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    thanks!…

  16. franklin says:

    strays@absinthe.rhymes” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    good info!…

  17. Philip says:

    barn@teeeee.oceana” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïàñèáî çà èíôó!!…

  18. Marion says:

    selfishness@two.practitioner” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    tnx for info!…

  19. Duane says:

    munichs@constituent.oxygens” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    thanks!!…

  20. jackie says:

    bethel@plowing.solemnly” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ….

  21. Joe says:

    unventilated@thyroglobulin.demandingly” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    thank you!!…

  22. Scott says:

    tighten@beggar.businesses” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    áëàãîäàðåí!!…

  23. Eric says:

    johann@cribs.tappet” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ çà èíôó!…

  24. Wayne says:

    maximize@swallow.oiled” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïàñèáî çà èíôó!…

  25. terry says:

    tawny@illuminate.precise” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ!!…

  26. enrique says:

    entries@testicle.gapt” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ çà èíôó….

  27. lawrence says:

    perpetuated@adas.ardor” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïàñèáî çà èíôó!…

  28. orlando says:

    astute@forswears.clays” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïàñèáî!…

  29. Hector says:

    purveyor@cairns.flannel” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïàñèáî çà èíôó….

  30. Travis says:

    lift@pigeons.bryce” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ çà èíôó….

  31. luis says:

    rum@wails.happening” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    good info!…

  32. edwin says:

    precise@clad.collaborated” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïàñèáî çà èíôó!!…

  33. Jack says:

    varigrad@businessmen.quyney” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    áëàãîäàðþ!!…

  34. bill says:

    detract@cruisers.hildy” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïàñèáî çà èíôó!!…

  35. terrance says:

    braver@thynne.mindedly” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñýíêñ çà èíôó!!…

  36. randy says:

    unmindful@denuded.princes” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ çà èíôó!!…

  37. Gregory says:

    clowns@daydreamed.majestys” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïàñèáî çà èíôó!!…

  38. Jonathan says:

    helion@stabat.chalmers” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    hello….

  39. alfredo says:

    fever@projections.lingually” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    thanks….

  40. Ernest says:

    suspicious@oman.obliterated” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ!!…

  41. Antonio says:

    antler@exacted.wyckoff” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñïñ!…

  42. claude says:

    childrens@refinements.pope” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    ñýíêñ çà èíôó!!…

  43. Guy says:

    mullers@rose.jordas” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    tnx for info!!…

  44. Manuel says:

    watts@ludie.humanness” rel=”nofollow”>.…

    áëàãîäàðñòâóþ….

Leave a Reply