Archive for January, 2013

Goldilicious Pinkalicious Lowest Price!

Monday, January 7th, 2013

Goldilicious Pinkalicious

Goldilicious Pinkalicious Lowest Price!

Compare & Purchase Goldilicious Pinkalicious at Amazon by clicking here!

List Price: $17.99

Amazon Price: $9.90

Click Here To Purchase At Amazon!

Goldilicious Pinkalicious Description:

Being Pinkalicious is pinkatastic, especially when she’s accompanied by her pet unicorn, Goldilicious. Goldie is a roller-skating, kite-flying, high-jumping unicorn who will protect Pinkalicious from the evil wizardry of her little brother, Peter. Together, Pinkalicious and Goldilicious can conquer anything!

This enchanting follow-up to the New York Times bestselling Pinkalicious and Purplicious brings to life a new and magical character that is every bit as captivating as her pinkeriffic owner. With heaps of creativity and a touch of sparkle, Goldilicious glows—from horn to toe.

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #1449 in Books
  • Published on: 2009-05-26
  • Released on: 2009-05-26
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 40 pages

Features

  • ISBN13: 9780061244087
  • Condition: NEW
  • Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark.

Customer Reviews:

I wish the authors would stick to the Pinkalicious formula3
We own all three “licious” books. Pinkalicious, of course, being the gold standard with the creative and captivating plot. Purplicious was pretty much a bomb, though the illustrations were still striking and beautiful. I was crossing my fingers hard for “Goldilicious”, because I know the author has the talent necessary to make a riveting and clever story. Though children will be interested in the story in Goldilicious, it still falls flat and is hardly memorable. We will still read and enjoy it, but I just can’t help but compare the last two books to the first one.
Next time I hope to see the formula of Pinkalicious followed more closely. Maybe something with more pink emphasis…or maybe with Pinkalicious turning a new color.

Not bad, but not on par with the original…3
Pinkalicious is funny, original, and very entertaining, even for adults. (It’s one I don’t mind reading over and over)

Not your usual kid fare and likely to become a classic.

Unfortunately, like most sequels, Purplicious and Goldilicious are not nearly as good as the original

Pinkalicious: 5 stars. Manic and Hysterical. “Speed dialed the pediatrician,” “Pinkerbelle” and other great lines make this a joy even for adults to read, which is good since you’ll be reading it over…and over…and over…

Purplicious: 3 stars, Still interesting and worthy of 4 stars except that the negativity, cliquishness, teasing is better suited for older kids. Maybe.

Goldilicious: 3 stars - An imaginary unicorn called Goldalicious makes for a very promising start, but then the story bogs down in repetition with not a lot of sophistication. More suited to younger kids as Pinkalicious but not as sophisticated or interesting for adults.

Other recent children’s books I rate five stars are “Dexter Beasley and the Big Blue Beastie,” “Click, Clack, Moo” and “Princess and the Pizza”

If you’ve found this review to be helpful, please let me know!

Disappointing2
What a disappointment! The story of Goldilicious is nothing like the previous two books in the series. My daughter loves to re-read the first two and hear how Pinkalicious deals with her “problem” of loving pink. She does not want to read this one again.

The fantasy story of Goldicious is so unrelated and makes me wonder if its odd storyline is why the sisters decided not to co-author this time around.

About the Author

Victoria Kann’s award-winning artwork has graced the covers and pages of many magazines, newspapers, and books. She is the illustrator and coauthor with Elizabeth Kann of Pinkalicious and Purplicious, which were both New York Times bestsellers. They also wrote Pinkalicious: The Musical, which premiered in New York City to sold-out audiences. Victoria teaches at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Recently she built a tree house for her Princess Pinkerbelles. She often hears galloping in the house and wonders if it’s Goldilicious or just her Pinkerbelles.

The Prayers and Personal Devotions of Mother Angelica Review.

Monday, January 7th, 2013

The Prayers and Personal Devotions of Mother Angelica

The Prayers and Personal Devotions of Mother Angelica Review.

Compare & Purchase The Prayers and Personal Devotions of Mother Angelica at Amazon by clicking here!

List Price: $17.00

Amazon Price: $11.56

Click Here To Purchase At Amazon!

The Prayers and Personal Devotions of Mother Angelica Description:

For the first time, you can pray with a woman who has transformed the lives of millions around the world.

This precious collection gives readers a chance to experience the personal, daily, spiritual practice of Mother Angelica. Seen by millions each day on the television network she founded, Mother Angelica is one of the most trusted and beloved religious figures of our time. Her words of wisdom about the spiritual life have been broadcast throughout the world on EWTN and have become New York Times bestselling books. For Mother the act of prayer is an unceasing daily conversation with the Divine—one that has been a source of inspiration and solace for nearly seven decades. Now Mother Angelica shares a lifetime of her private prayers and devotions so that you can experience and utter the very words that have shaped her incredible life.
This treasury of material, much of it never before published, includes:

* A complete prayer journal composed during Mother’s personal dark night of the soul
* Handwritten meditations offered to her sisters
* Two moving versions of the Stations of the Cross composed for her community
* Devotions and petitions from her early religious life

Throughout, Mother Angelica’s humor, warmth, and wisdom shine through. More than a collection of prayers, this special volume is an intimate portrait of one of the world’s great women of faith. For devoted fans of Mother Angelica as well as for those just coming to know her, this inspiring guide will be a cherished companion along each step of the path to holiness.

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #1104 in Books
  • Published on: 2010-03-02
  • Released on: 2010-03-02
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 208 pages

Features

  • ISBN13: 9780307588258
  • Condition: NEW
  • Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark.

Customer Reviews:

Private devotions5
I thought this book was very helpful and inspirational. It is so compact you can even take it to Church with you. Best of all, it is available on Kindle, so I ordered one as a gift and one for myself.

Grace Fills The Pages5
As always, Raymond Arroyo’s captures the beauty of Mother Angelica’s spiritual life. I found the book uplifting and I keep it close by so that I can open it to any page and be enriched by Mother’s wisdom.
I highly recommend the book to Catholics and non-Catholics alike!

A must read.5
This wonderful book is a must read for anyone looking for comfort from our troubled times.

About the Author
MOTHER ANGELICA, born Rita Antoinette Rizzo, established Our Lady of the Angels Monastery in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1961. Twenty years later, she founded the Eternal World Television Network, which reaches more than 184 million TV viewers and radio listeners around the world.

RAYMOND ARROYO is the news director and lead anchor of EWTN News. As host of the award-winning The World Over, he is seen in more than 148 million households each week. He is author of the New York Times bestselling biography of Mother Angelica and regularly appears on network and cable television and on radio.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.
The Prayers & Personal Devotions of Mother Angelica

Opening Prayers…

O God, Holy Ghost, Who didst inspire the author of this book with Thy light, and art, thus teaching us and permitting us to hear Thy voice and also Thy divine instructions, grant us the grace to understand them rightly, that relishing them and practicing them in all our actions, for Thy greater honor and for our progress in perfection, we may know Thee, O God, more perfectly and love Thee more ardently.
O Blessed Virgin Mary, implore for us this grace. Amen. —Poor Clares of Perpetual Adoration Prayer Book

I stand before You, Lord God, a sinner. In all the realms of Your creation no one is more undeserving of Your love than I. This is why I dare approach Your Presence. Your power is at its best in weakness, Your love is more gratuitous to the ungrateful, and Your mercy more sublime to the undeserving. —Mother Angelica

The Private Prayers… At The Start of Day

Prayer in the Morning

Good morning, Jesus. I want to give You this day with all my love. I want to unite my every thought and action with every thought and action of Your earthly life. Help me to be kind and patient. It looks like a difficult day—a day of decision and I’m not sure of the right course to take. A day of pain and I feel weak, a day of uncertainty and I tend to lose hope. Don’t let me forget Your Abiding Love and Providence today. Walk beside me and when I hesitate put Your arms around me and steady my faltering steps. Guide me in Your paths and give me that assurance that comes with Faith; Faith in Your Promises, Faith in Your Love.

Prayer Before Work

In Nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritus Sancti. Amen.
To Thy love, O my God, I consecrate all the work and actions of this day, in union with those of Thy beloved Son whilst here on earth, and with His purest intentions. I offer them through the Immaculate Heart of Mary to Thy greater glory and in the spirit of adoration of the Most Blessed Sacrament. Hail Mary . . . (PCPA Prayer Book)

An Offering of Work

My Father, accept the work of my hands today in union with the labor of Jesus during His life. I offer to You the fatigue and tension of this day in union with the weariness of Jesus as He walked from town to town. My actions are imperfect, my motives are often selfish, but everything I do this day I unite with the most pure motives of Jesus and His perfect life. I desire to please You alone and to love You with the love of the Holy Spirit.

Prayer at Work

Lord God, show me Your Will in my life. Give me the work that is best suited to the talents You have given me. Bless me with fellow workers who will help me stay close to You. Grant that my work may not be a source of disturbance or temptation. Give me the strength to do it well and enthusiastically and bless my efforts to witness to Your love. Give me a just wage and do not permit me to desire more than I deserve. Bless my employer and give him the wisdom to use the gifts You have given him for Your honor and glory. Lord Jesus, do not permit me to lose sight of Your Presence in my soul today. Quiet the noise around me so I may hear the soft whisper of Your Voice.

Humility and Pardon

A Prayer for Humility

You’ve got to watch your own thoughts. When you are conscious of an unloving, unkind, critical, or hateful thought against anyone; whether present or elsewhere, check it immediately. Strike your breast and say: “Jesus, if it wasn’t for you, I wouldn’t be able to breathe. Be merciful to me, a poor sinner.”
Humble yourself, and you’ll be surprised how good that other person looks. It’s because we’re not humble that we have the effrontery to tear other people down.

To Be Humble of Heart

In the world, my Lord, one must be great to speak to the great but with You one must be small and of little account. It is only when I think of Your greatness and majesty that I realize how pride must offend You. How can a small, created being rear its head in defiance of Omnipotence? It is truly a manifestation of Your Mercy and Love that You do not annihilate me when I defy Your Law and reject Your Love. O Humble God, make me humble of heart.
Few souls understand what God would accomplish in them if they were to abandon themselves unreservedly to Him and if they were to allow His grace to mold them accordingly. —St. Ignatius Loyola

Prayer for Pardon

Lord God, I ask pardon for all our sins: For all the times we’ve offended You in thought, word, or deed; for the selfishness in our lives and the ego that blocks You out of our minds and hearts. I ask pardon for the distractions that keep leading us away from You. I ask Your mercy upon us, and on the whole world. Prepare our hearts and minds, Lord, for what is to come. Prepare our souls, our thoughts, our will, and give us strength to fight the good fight. Give us communal love, Lord, the kind that will bind us together as one in the heart of Jesus. We ask Lord, small and insignificant as we are, that we may give you comfort and love. We ask for pardon, Lord, for those who crowned you with thorns by their pride and arrogance. We ask pardon for those who scourge you at the pillar by their immorality. Lord, we ask pardon for those who strip You of Your garments by their greed and ambition for worldly things. We ask pardon for all priests and religious who have been nailed to the cross with vows and have not been faithful. We ask pardon for all mankind, for the whole world, for all of our sins. Be merciful to us, Lord. We praise and glorify Your name, for You are holy, You alone. Glorify Your justice, Lord and Your mercy. We praise and bless You. Amen.

Prayer for Kindness

Dear Jesus, make me kind. I look at Your life and Your kindness stands out like a lone star on a dark night. No matter how tired You were You always had time for the sick, poor sinners, children, and all those in need. Your Heart had sympathy for their weaknesses and You reached out to them with loving compassion. When I feel impatient with the frailties of my neighbor, Lord Jesus, grant that I may not only think of Your kindness but stop for a moment and enter into it; let me feel Your kindness in the depths of my soul so that my prayer will not be empty. I need to participate in Your kindness if I am to be kind. I cannot do it on my own. My poor soul tends to be critical of others and this makes me impatient and unkind. You understood human nature so well that You gave everyone an opportunity to repent. You never picked out the trivial faults of Your Apostles or demanded exterior perfection. The only time You corrected them was when the faults they committed were deeply interior and endangered their union with You and the Father. Jealousy, ambition, and greed were the faults that You quickly brought out into the open so You could cleanse the Apostles of these dangerous temptations. Give me the grace, Lord Jesus, to distinguish between faults of character that form part of my neighbor’s temperament and evil tendencies that destroy grace in his soul. Help me to endure the former with love and to correct the latter with courage. Help me to love the sinner but never condone his sin. Please, dear Jesus, let me first remove the beam from my own eye before I even see the splinter in the eye of my neighbor.

Gratitude and Self-knowledge

Lord Jesus, I feel so sad every time I think of the nine lepers who never returned to say “Thank You.” It is hard to conceive of anyone so selfish, and yet how often do I remember to thank You for all the gifts and graces You have given to me? It is so easy to see faults in other people and completely overlook my own. Are the faults I see in others a mirror of my own soul? Gentle Jesus, I recoil at the prospect that what I see in others must be in me. If this is true, and I fear it is, would not this be a step toward self-knowledge?

To Forgive and Forget

Lord, I need Your help—help to love those who do not love me in return. I find this so difficult. What must You feel when You love me and I turn away! I need Your grace to forgive and forget. Injustice cries out for revenge and old memories bring back old wounds that smart and sting. Cover my poor soul with the healing balm of love and compassion. Make me unselfish sweet Jesus, so I will be content with just loving and count it a privilege to forgive even seventy times seven.

Practical Pleas

Prayer to Obtain Favors

This prayer comes from the Poor Clares of Perpetual Adoration Prayer Book that Mother used as a young sister. It is believed that those who recite this prayer fifteen times daily from the feast of St. Andrew (November 30) until Christmas will receive what they ask.

Hail! and blessed be the hour and moment in which the Son of God was born of the most pure Virgin in Bethlehem, at midnight, in piercing cold. In that hour vouchsafe, O my God, to hear my prayers and grant my desires, through the merits of our Savior Jesus Christ and of His Virgin Mother. Amen.

A Prayer of Supplication

Knowing Your Infinite Goodness, I dare to ask for all the material and spiritual things I need to live on this earth and to safely arrive in the Kingdom. I ask for work and the strength to accomplish it well. I ask for health when that condition is necessary for my well-being. I ask for pain when it will prune my soul or prevent me from walking the path of sin. I ask for good friends—friends that love me for myself and will stay by me in success and failure. I ask for peace in my family—the kind of peace that is built on love and forbearance. I ask for the forgiveness of my sins and the sins of the whole world. I ask for virtue, especially that particular virtue that will help me overcome my predominant fault—the fault that is the cause of most of my failures. I ask that Y…

Ford County: Stories-Retail $24.00! Sale Only $16.32!

Sunday, January 6th, 2013

Ford County: Stories

Ford County: Stories-Retail $24.00! Sale Only $16.32!

Compare & Purchase Ford County: Stories at Amazon by clicking here!

List Price: $24.00

Amazon Price: $16.32

Click Here To Purchase At Amazon!

Ford County: Stories Description:

In his first collection of short stories John Grisham takes us back to Ford County, Mississippi, the setting of his first novel, A Time to Kill.

Wheelchair-bound Inez Graney and her two older sons, Leon and Butch, take a bizarre road trip through the Mississippi Delta to visit the youngest Graney brother, Raymond, who’s been locked away on death row for eleven years. It could well be their last visit.

Mack Stafford, a hard-drinking and low-grossing run-of-the-mill divorce lawyer gets a miracle phone call with a completely unexpected offer to settle some old, forgotten cases for more money than he has ever seen. Mack is suddenly bored with the law, fed up with his wife and his life, and makes drastic plans to finally escape.

Quiet, dull Sidney, a data collector for an insurance company, perfects his blackjack skills in hopes of bringing down the casino empire of Clanton’s most ambitious hustler, Bobby Carl Leach, who, among other crimes, has stolen Sidney’s wife.

Three good ol’ boys from rural Ford County begin a journey to the big city of Memphis to give blood to a grievously injured friend. However, they are unable to drive past a beer store as the trip takes longer and longer. The journey comes to an abrupt end when they make a fateful stop at a Memphis strip club.

The Quiet Haven Retirement Home is the final stop for the elderly of Clanton. It’s a sad, languid place with little controversy, until Gilbert arrives. Posing as a lowly paid bedpan boy, he is in reality a brilliant stalker with an uncanny ability to sniff out the assets of those “seniors” he professes to love.

One of the hazards of litigating against people in a small town is that one day, long after the trial, you will probably come face-to-face with someone you’ve beaten in a lawsuit. Lawyer Stanley Wade bumps into an old adversary, a man with a long memory, and the encounter becomes a violent ordeal.

Clanton is rocked with the rumor that the gay son of a prominent family has finally come home, to die. Of AIDS. Fear permeates the town as gossip runs unabated. But in Lowtown, the colored section of Clanton, the young man finds a soul mate in his final days.

Featuring a cast of characters you’ll never forget, these stories bring Ford County to vivid and colorful life. Often hilarious, frequently moving, and always entertaining, this collection makes it abundantly clear why John Grisham is our most popular storyteller.

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #513 in Books
  • Published on: 2009-11-03
  • Released on: 2009-11-03
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 320 pages

Features

  • ISBN13: 9780385532457
  • Condition: NEW
  • Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark.

Customer Reviews:

In the grand storytelling tradition…5
John Grisham is a storyteller. For all the flack he takes for being a “pop” author, this man knows how to tell a tale. The only thing this book was missing was a rocking chair and a porch. These are stories that might have been told on a lazy Sunday evening while sitting on grandpa’s lap listening to the cicadas playing a tune composed by Mother Nature. These stories run the gambit from touching, to sinister, to the unthinkable, to heart-wrenching to, “yep that’s what you get”, to my favorite… the “illegal yes, but I’ll bet it felt so good”!
Until Grisham’s `Playing for Pizza’, I avoided his non-lawyer novels. Well, I ended up enjoying that one and I really enjoyed this one. Like I said earlier, John is a mesmerizing storyteller and, although these stories are not related in any way, they flow like they are.

My favorite story, by FAR, was `Fish Files’. (Think of the movie `Falling Down’ without the violence and caffeine). Maybe it’s because I wish for this sort of thing to happen to me or maybe because I love living vicariously through a story. Whatever the reason, I really enjoyed reading about Mack because he didn’t hesitate when opportunity kicked down his door. Be a good man… bah! Sticking with good southern values… whatever! Doing what your Sunday school teacher said… yeah ummm… I think I’ll pass. I simply loved this story!!

`Casino’ came a very, very close second. Each one of these seven stories creates a different feeling, gives birth to a unique memory, speaks to hidden emotions, and, in a small way, enriches the human spirit. His pop success made him famous, but it’s his ability to grab and never let go that makes his books unforgettable. As a book lover/fanatic, I really enjoy authors’ who have that ZING it takes to grab my attention and that indescribable POW that keeps me reading. This is a wonderful, classic, short story collection.

THE BLITZ REVIEW OF FORD COUNTY5
America’s greatest contribution to literary forms is the short story. Just refer to a strange looking gentleman named Poe. So why is it that so many prominent American writers today seem to have forgotten the short story?
John Grisham to the rescue! His recently published collection of short stories, “FORD COUNTY”, is one of the best books of 2009.
The book is composed of seven beautifully written tales from Grisham’s roots in Mississippi. Each story is a gem! The mostly contemporary plots range from hilarity (”Blood Drive”) to heartache (”Michael’s Room”). By the end of the last selection (”Funny Boy”), the reader wishes there were seven more.
This is a great writer at his best, and one hopes that in the future Mr. Grisham will bring us more tales from Ford County. Get the book and enjoy every word. “Ford County” is superb!

BRUCE SPERBER

Grisham fans: Welcome back to Clanton!4
Wow! I was at the bookstore this morning to check out the new releases and this was on a display so I picked it up. You know those books that you pick up out of curiosity and then read a page or two? And then another couple pages? And pretty soon you are all the way through the first story? This is one of those. I had to buy it because I’d gotten engrossed in Raymond’s story, an inmate on death row who has written his memoir. I went home(the kids are sick today) and settled in with the book and started over from the beginning.

Clanton, the town where Grisham’s first blockbuster “A Time to Kill” takes place is now the setting for a number of unique characters, something a bit of an island of misfit toys. The book is a composite of seven stories- and yet, maybe because of the setting and the writing style, the stories flowed into one another and gave me a sense of a bigger picture than just a collection of individual stories.

I haven’t felt terribly compelled by Grisham in recent years, yet, these stories are good- really good. They felt warm and comfortable. His writing style reminds me of pulling on a pair of well worn jeans. His characters are robust, real and sympathetic. The themes are common and even if one can’t relate to all of the characters, you will find something for just about everyone here.

Some of the scenes are a little far-fetched and yet, I think it is the characters and the sense of humor with which Grisham write that makes me not just believe, but want to believe. You can almost hear the drawl of the South and the world slowing down as you get deeper into the stories.

Plenty of intrigue and, of course, what Grisham is so well-known for- writing about the law and those who exact it. I don’t think his usual legal thriller readers will be at all disappointed even if the pace is a bit slower- the writing is compelling enough to hold. A good collection in a somewhat neglected genre of short-storytelling, I recommend it wholly. I think it is some of his better work in recent history.

Amazon.com Review
Amazon Exclusive: Pat Conroy Reviews Ford County

Pat Conroy is most recently the author of the #1 New York Times bestseller South of Broad, as well as eight previous books: The Boo, The Water Is Wide, The Great Santini, The Lords of Discipline, The Prince of Tides, Beach Music, My Losing Season, and The Pat Conroy Cookbook: Recipes of My Life. He lives on Fripp Island, South Carolina. Read his exclusive Amazon guest review of Ford County:

In the mail last week, I received a copy of John Grisham’s latest fiction. It surprised me that the book was comprised of seven short stories. From the time I first began publishing at Doubleday, they have always made sure that I received a copy of a Grisham book long before it went on sale in the bookstores. He has written 22 books, and I’ve read them all as soon as they were available in crisp review copies.

I have loved the Grisham books for the same reason that I love the works of John Irving, Richard Russo, or Anne Rivers Siddons: I get hooked by an early page, and pure habit forces me to read until I am issued my walking papers and can return to my normal life. These writers are all wish-bringers who cast spells with the bright enchantment of their stories, and the power of story has retained its glamour and necessity for me. I’ve always liked it when Grisham took a sabbatical from his impressive fiction to romp in the field of sports or non-fiction.

John surprised me by entering the ring of danger that the short story represents for all writers. In the world of writing, the poets come first as they finger the language like worry beads and wonder where their next meal is coming from. The art of the short story writer is one of economy, concision, and the genius of trying to craft a whole world inside a mason jar. The modern world punishes the short story writer with inattention. The literary reviews keep the short story alive and finger-popping in America today, while the New Yorker tries to strangle the form with its bare hands. But a great short story is a source of joy, and the reading of Chekhov, de Maupassant, Flannery O’Connor and others offer pleasures unmatched by any other form. Since I’m incapable of writing the short story form, I wanted to see how Grisham fared, knowing the critics would sharpen their swords against him no matter how accomplished his stories might be.

Ford County is the best writing that John Grisham has ever done. One of the many things I’ve admired about his books is his intimate chronicle of Mississippi life in the generations following William Faulkner and Eudora Welty. Grisham writes equally well about the plantation south, the black south, and white-cracker south. Over the years he has used the legal system as an instrument to illuminate the world of mansions and sharecroppers and everything in between as he not only defined Mississippi but also staked it out as his home fictional territory. His short stories were a surprise to me. All of them are very good; three of them, I believe, are great. Grisham has always had a rare gift for breaking hearts when he invokes unforgettable images of the broken, hopeless South. Some of the stories are hilarious, and Grisham’s gift of humor has never found a showcase like this. One of these stories should find its way into the anthologies of the best short stories of 2009. It might not happen, but I for one think the stories in Ford County are that damned good.–Pat Conroy

(Photo © David G. Spielman)


From Publishers Weekly
Returning to the setting of his first novel, A Time to Kill, longtime bestseller Grisham presents seven short stories about the residents of Ford County, Miss. Each story explores different themes-mourning, revenge, justice, acceptance, evolution-but all flirt with the legal profession, the staple of (former attorney) Grisham’s oeuvre. Fans will be excited to settle back into Grisham’s world, and these easily digestible stories don’t disappoint, despite their brevity. Full of strong characters, simple but resonant plotlines, and charming Southern accents, this collection is solid throughout; though his literary aspirations may seem quaint, Grisham succeeds admirably in his crowd-pleasing craft while avoiding pat endings or oversimplifying (perhaps best exemplified in “Michael’s Room,” which finds a lawyer facing the consequences of successfully defending a doctor against a malpractice suit). As always, Grisham balances his lawyerly preoccupations with a deep respect for his undereducated and overlooked characters.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From The Washington Post
From The Washington Post’s Book World/washingtonpost.com Reviewed by by Carolyn See “Ford County” is a collection of short stories by a man who has sold millions of copies of his legal thrillers in this country alone. John Grisham is still in the prime of his writing life, a devoted baseball fan, a devout Baptist who has done missionary work in Brazil, a rural Southerner who practiced law in a small Mississippi town for nearly a decade at the beginning of his literary career. He’s a writer whose paperbacks can be read without embarrassment by businessmen on airplanes, because his work tends to avoid sex or violence and to concentrate on puzzles alone. But because Grisham has always produced novels as plentifully as peanuts, because his second novel, “The Firm,” sold a bazillion copies, or maybe because he’s handsome, well-behaved and decorous, “real” writers (whoever they may be) have traditionally held him in low esteem, notwithstanding the fact that he has endowed numerous scholarships and been extremely active in promoting Southern regional literature. “Real” writers tend to be cranky where other people’s success is concerned. It must be true, mustn’t it, that Grisham can’t write his way out of a paper bag. Of course, he does have that weird, mesmerizing thing that keeps the reader turning pages, but there you go: Grisham writes mere page-turners! And so the “real” writers rest their collective case. “Ford County,” his first collection of short stories, provides one more reason to ignore those naysayers. Set in a small Mississippi town not unlike the one in which Grisham started practicing law, these seven stories seem so artless that the artlessness turns into an art. They’re terrifically charming, if only for this one thing: They start out at a beginning and march straight through to an end. They lack plot twists, literary surprises, authorial showing off. With one exception, they seem as real as real can be. They’re written about a world that is, indeed, foreign to most of us: the fictional Southern town of Clanton, population 10,000, a place with only 51 lawyers to its name. The little town is surrounded by rural enclaves, woods and farmland, acreage that shelters poor farmers but is also coveted by shady developers. The streets of Clanton are lined on one side with the mansions of old white landowners and on the other with the modest homes of African Americans who have lived there as long as the gouging landowners. It’s a microcosm of America — at least of those citizens who haven’t run off to the anonymity of big-city life and all the daydreams of urban success. The stories march sturdily along. I dare you to raise your head from “Blood Drive,” in which a man named Bailey is injured in a construction accident. Three young guys who barely know him pile into a truck with the poorly formed idea of donating blood. After too many beer stops and the dawning realization that they don’t even know what Memphis hospital he was taken to, their misfortunes pile up. In “Fetching Raymond,” two white-trash brothers who’ve lived “sad and chaotic lives” drive with their mother to a nearby prison where their brother is to be executed for murder. Raymond has used his time on death row to write bad novels, poems and endless letters; he’s studied “meditation, kung fu, aerobics, weight lifting, fasting.” He’s become a legend in his own mind, but the indifferent gas chamber awaits. And in “Fish Files,” a middle-aged lawyer whose wife and children scorn him happens upon a chance to make a substantial amount of ill-gotten money. How many married men have dreamed of disappearing off the face of the Earth, wiping their pasts clean away and spending the remainder of their lives sunning themselves on the beach? “Fish Files” may serve as their personal handbook. The remaining four stories carry their own quiet fascination. “Casino” follows the fortunes of a dull man who learns to count cards, loses, wins back his wife and makes a bundle along the way. “Funny Boy” is a sermon about being white and gay during the ’80s; “Michael’s Room” is a set piece about justice gone wrong; and “Quiet Haven” is a shamelessly sweet story about an ambiguously altruistic crook and a flock of forgotten senior citizens. There’s a lordly grandeur about refusing to copy-edit or revise here, which in the end turns out to be quite winning. Words are repeated carelessly all over the place; adverbs abound. My favorite sentence, attributed to the crook from “Quiet Haven” as he visits the Clanton courthouse to do some research, runs like this: “A lonely Confederate soldier in bronze stands atop a granite statue, gazing north, looking for the enemy.” Did some copy editor notice this, consider pointing it out to the novelist and then reconsider? Was Grisham just amusing himself, conjuring up the Cirque de Soleil on that quiet Southern lawn? In any event, those acrobatic sculptures cast a charmingly cozy light on the sober, ultra-realistic stories, stories that — no matter what your literary scruples — you absolutely can’t stop reading. bookworld@washpost.com
Copyright 2009, The Washington Post. All Rights Reserved.

J.R. Ward Box Set-Retail $47.94! Sale Only $28.04!

Saturday, January 5th, 2013

J.R. Ward Box Set

J.R. Ward Box Set-Retail $47.94! Sale Only $28.04!

Compare & Purchase J.R. Ward Box Set at Amazon by clicking here!

List Price: $47.94

Amazon Price: $28.04

Click Here To Purchase At Amazon!

J.R. Ward Box Set Description:

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #478 in Books
  • Published on: 2009-09-29
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Mass Market Paperback
  • 1 pages

Customer Reviews:

Glad I took the plunge.5
Having been a fan of vampire novels since, well, forever, I have seen JR Ward’s work in bookstores and never picked up one of her books. Well, out came this box set and I thought, why not? Needless to say, I am so glad I took the plunge! The reading is intese and very sexy. I liked the action and pacing of the novels. This took me some time to get through, but I am now considering reading some of the novels again and that’s saying something! All I can say is that if you have not read JR Ward before, you might like it. I know I did. Also liked, too, Dead Sexy Vampire Erotica: Two Dark and Thirsty Stories.

A page turner, with some flaws4
I read the first four of the series of six so far. These books are truly page turners. You get sucked into the universe Ward created and care for most of the characters. The love interests are developed well (with occasional cheesy lines but you go along with it) and you can’t get enough of them.

On the flipside, here is why I did not give five stars:The “street” slang the brothers are speaking really irritated me, as it didn’t sound genuine at all. I live in New York and hear a fair amount of “street” slang, and it does not sound like this. (Questions ending with “…, true?” Who talks like that?) Also, I am not sure if Ms Ward knows what blunts are. Usually they are not made with rolling paper. True connosseurs of rap music, even gangsta rap, would probably find something better to listen to than D-12… Ms Ward needs a “street editor” if she wants to continue this, but also, why do centuries old vampires act like that anyway? I am not usually a romance genre reader, and it also bothered me a bit that every book seemed to follow a similar pattern in terms of the main love interests, and have a happy happy ending where most loose ends were tied.

Having said all this, I read four books in 6 days, so clearly I liked it.

Black Dagger Brotherhood Series5
This series of the Black Dagger Brotherhood by J. R. Ward is the best I have read. It is absolutely an adult read, but is acceptable for all adults. My daughter who is 39, my friends who range in age from 35 to 65, and myself all have read and reread this series. I am 70. I am totally in love with the great males in this series, and also their females. I cry with them and laugh with them. I have already pre-ordered the next book from Amazon, which should be about John Matthew. Try these books. You will be hooked, and if you order it from Amazon, you get a great price.

Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally Sale-$13.57!

Saturday, January 5th, 2013

Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally

Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally Sale-$13.57!

Compare & Purchase Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally at Amazon by clicking here!

List Price: $19.95

Amazon Price: $13.57

Click Here To Purchase At Amazon!

Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally Description:

In October 2003, Patti Digh’s stepfather was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died 37 days later. The timeframe made an impression on her. What emerged was a commitment to ask herself every morning: What would I be doing today if I had only 37 days left to live? The answers changed her life and led to this new kind of book. Part meditation, part how-to guide, part memoir, Life is a Verb is all heart. 

 

Within these pages—enhanced by original artwork and wide, inviting margins ready to be written in—Digh identifies six core practices to jump-start a meaningful life: Say Yes, Trust Yourself, Slow Down, Be Generous, Speak Up, and Love More. Within this framework she supplies 37 edgy, funny, and literary life stories, each followed by a “do it now” 10-minute exercise as well as a practice to try for 37 days—and perhaps the rest of your life.

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #2321 in Books
  • Published on: 2008-08-26
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 240 pages

Features

Customer Reviews:

This book contains a radical thought: Your life is bigger than headline news5
In the beginning, this book really annoyed me.

Here’s the set-up: “In October of 2003, my stepfather was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died 37 days later.”

Tragic. Though I can’t imagine, I can empathize. But then comes the goopy stuff:

“The time frame of 37 days made an impression on me. We often live as if we have all the time in the world, but the definite-ness of 37 days was striking. So short a time, as if all the regrets and joys of a life would barely have time to register before time was up….”

“I tried to reconcile the fact that this fearful death was happening with the understanding that I needed to make something good out of it. What emerged was a commitment to ask myself this question every morning: What would I be doing today if I only had 37 days to live?”

Well, you know the answer. Savor every second. “Enjoy every sandwich,” as the dying Warren Zevon put it. Buddhism 101. The punch line of a million self-help books.

So was I moved by Ms. Digh’s approach to her theoretical last 37 days — pumping out reams of writing so her young daughters would have some idea who Mom was? No. And not because I’m hard-hearted. It’s just that I’ve heard all this. Many times, most recently in “Improv Wisdom”, which I consider the last word on Showing Up and Being Here.

But I stumbled on, past the beautifully designed pages with the lovely art and the super-sincere poems by poets I’d never heard of, until I achieved the entrance to Part One. “Inhabit Your Story.” The predictable moral arrived on schedule: “Find the change you can make and make it.”

On to Part Two: “The Six Practices for Intentional Living.” Which includes: “Dance in your car”, followed by “carry a small grape” and “always rent the red convertible” and “say wow when you see as bus”.

What was I doing in this Birkenstock gulag, surrounded by Good Thoughts?

But then I hit the story of Ms. Digh sitting on a plane next to a boor, and how they became close friends. The next page brought another compelling story. The Jungian analyst Marion Woodman, sick in India, is bothered by a large brown woman who crowds her on the couch of the hotel lobby. For days. On the fourth day, the woman’s husband shows up to say he had been sending his wife there to pour her warmth and life energy into the body of the dying Woodman. The woman had, Woodman decided, saved her life. And then came the story of Digh’s college lover, back in 1978. Richard was African-American. Her parents were less than thrilled. The relationship withered. Flash-cut to now. Richard is now Amanda. He wears his old girlfriend’s earrings.

Tell me enough stories, and one will be an arrow to the heart. Richard-and-Patti was, and then, suddenly, they all were — and advice like “Go to a black barbershop to get your hair cut if you’re a Caucasian” no longer seemed monumentally trite. Reading on, I learned about hikaru dorodango — shiny Japanese mud balls — and how to make better ones simply by making more. I learned how to disagree by saying, elegantly, “I don’t see the truth in that.” I was reminded what a dollar can mean to the person ahead of you in the supermarket line. I encountered some very wise quotations, like this, from Eric Hoffer: “You can discover what your enemy fears by observing the means he uses to frighten you.”

In short, as I read on, I found myself getting sharper and smarter. I considered why it might be better to make a mistake — and learn from it — than strain to get everything right. And I read the obituary Patti Digh wrote recently for her father — who died in 1980, when she was in her teens — and misted over.

The stories in the news these days are so big. Tectonic plates are moving. History is being made. But then, it always is. “Life is a Verb” is a reminder that our lives are bigger than the stories in the headlines. A small thought? Not to me. Now I have to go back to the beginning and start again….

Equal measures Joy, Responsibility5
Inspired by the death of her step-father (and informed by the death of her father), Patti Digh’s book offers advice, nudges, and insistence toward joy and responsibility (not quite the word I want), in equal measure.

With essays like “Dance in Your Car,” “Follow Your Desire Lines,” and “Always Rent the Red Convertible,” Digh urges us to loosen up, take chances, take hold of this “one wild and precious life” (as she quotes Mary Oliver).

But she assumes a life of joy will be a life touched and shaped by other people, and she includes their care in her instruction manual. “Save Face for Someone Else,” and “Wear Pink Glasses” offer models of graceful ways of being with, seeing, and upholding other people. “Love Unloveable People” gently offers each of us a daunting challenge: to respond to what is good in everyone.

Digh doesn’t overlook the challenges of relationship, including our relationship to self. From “Choose Your Seatmates Wisely,” to “Burn those Jeans,” “Don’t Sell Your Red Shoes” and “Say Wow When You See a Bus,” she offers fresh perspectives on familiar situations and straight-jackets of “propriety,” inviting each of us to find a way to be a little more authentic.

The essays alone would be engaging and provocative, as Digh has proven in her blog, 37days. In the book a precious few are arranged to illustrate her six-point guide to a life marked by Intensity, Inclusion, Integrity, Intimacy, Intuition, and Intention. Each is followed by a short exercise to help the reader respond to and integrate the example, and a longer “movement” exercise that readers are invited to take up for 37 days: be alone for 30 minutes every day, write ten letters (in longhand) over the course of 37 days, ask yourself at lunch (for 37 days) “Am I becoming someone I respect?”

Digh suggests we take on that last question at lunch, so that we have the afternoon to save ourselves, if we are failing. It is just this kind of gentle wisdom, this confidence in all of us, that leads me to embrace this book.

Thoughtful Joy5
It makes you think about how to live your life better - not necessarily more organized or efficient or more anything, unless the “more” is some part of your own personal “better”. The writing exercises are excellent, bite-sized, and spur you to much deeper consideration of the topics. And the writing itself is funny, real, down-to-earth and extremely moving. I’ve bought one copy and will buy several more as gifts.

Review

Life is a Verb is brilliantly-crafted, raw, gorgeously-designed, and daringly different from ’self-help’ books. It relates, through stories that sparkle and astonish and soar, how to move, to be on your way, to realize who you really are through your actions. Through exercises that you participate in, as if in conversation with the author, you will learn, as she promises in the prologue, ‘deeper things—how to know what to care about, how to treat others around you (and yourself), what to question, how to love, what to stand up for, and why you should tell stories and listen to the stories of others.’ There is no more important learning.

         So read it. Inhabit it. Breathe in every word, because every word of this book is essential. Let it animate you. Annotate it to make it your own. And then let it let you change yourself, and become who you were intended to be. Begin now. You have no time to lose.”
— Dave Pollard, author of The Natural Entrepreneur, and the weblog How to Save the World

 

 

“Patti’s guide for the last 37 days of life will turn every one of your next 3700 days a fully lived experience. If you had some unsolved fear for death, that would be your season ticket to have a free ride on the train with the author. I have never seen such a simultaneously practical, esthetic and soul-caressing book in my life.”

–Kichiro Hayashi, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo

 

 

“I laughed.  I cried.  I want the t-shirt!  Seriously, Life is a Verb may well be the single book that will change the world or maybe only your life . . .    Artful, funny, heart-breaking, Digh reminds us that today isn’t a dress rehearsal and we can start today celebrating the magic of ordinary life. Reading Life is a Verb is like mainlining goodness. Digh shows us what is real and what matters, and she gives us insiders tips on how to make minuscule life corrections that result in quantum shifts in experience.  She reminds us that life can easily be fun.  This will surely be the last self-help book you will ever need or want to read.”
–Patricia Ryan Madson, Stanford Emerita, author of Improv Wisdom: Don’t Prepare, Just Show Up

 

“Life Is A Verb is a wonderful treat! Good exercises, stories, and examples. Reading it will help you appreciate just how much can be gained through living with intention. It’s also a lot of fun.”
–Roger von Oech, author of A Whack on the Side of the Head: How You Can Be More Creative

Smart but Scattered: The Revolutionary “Executive Skills” Approach to Helping Kids Reach Their Potential-Retail $15.95! Sale Only $10.85!

Friday, January 4th, 2013

Smart but Scattered: The Revolutionary “Executive Skills” Approach to Helping Kids Reach Their Potential

Product: Smart but Scattered: The Revolutionary “Executive Skills” Approach to Helping Kids Reach Their Potential-Retail $15.95! Sale Only $10.85!

List Price: $15.95

Amazon Price: $10.85
Click Here To See Amazon Sale Price

Add to cart to see low price@CHADPRODUCTITLE

Availability: In Stock

Usually ships in 24 Hours

Free Shipping Available

Compare Prices on Smart but Scattered: The Revolutionary “Executive Skills” Approach to Helping Kids Reach Their Potential

There’s nothing more frustrating than watching your bright, talented son or daughter struggle with everyday tasks like finishing homework, putting away toys, or following instructions at school. Your “smart but scattered” child might also have trouble coping with disappointment or managing anger. Drs. Peg Dawson and Richard Guare have great news: there’s a lot you can do to help. The latest research in child development shows that many kids who have the brain and heart to succeed lack or lag behind in crucial “executive skills”–the fundamental habits of mind required for getting organized, staying focused, and controlling impulses and emotions. Learn easy-to-follow steps to identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses, use activities and techniques proven to boost specific skills, and problem-solve daily routines. Small changes can add up to big improvements–this empowering book shows how.

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #1260 in Books
  • Published on: 2009-01-02
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 314 pages

Features

  • ISBN13: 9781593854454
  • Condition: NEW
  • Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark.

marginally helpful3
This book provides interesting background, though it excludes so many areas of psychology and neurophysiology. I do like very much the way executive function is broken into the specific areas of skill acquisition. And the real life examples provided to illustrate struggles are excellent. As both a clinician and a parent, I find the solutions offered completely unrealistic for all except the youngest children - maybe 8 and under. It is a very good attempt at tackling this emerging science in comprehensible terms for parents and professionals who work with children. My biggest criticism is on the section regarding organization. If that is your primary concern as a reader, look elsewhere. This section is not correct and very inadequate.

Smart but Scattered5
As a Special Ed. teacher, I found this book to be very helpful. It is user friendly and has easy to use forms. I was originally looking for information as to how to get my students organized with homework and day to day tasks. This book had what I was looking for and some. I recommend it for teachers and parents as well.

Both practical and sophisticated: A great resource5
I am a child/adolescent psychologist. This book is excellent in terms of helping you identify areas in need of support and providing practical ways to help support kids to be more successful at home and at school. I highly recommend it to parents, teachers, and psychologists. The content is particularly relevant for intermediate elementary grades, middle school, and high school students.

Life of Pi Review.

Thursday, January 3rd, 2013

Life of Pi

Life of Pi Review.

Compare & Purchase Life of Pi at Amazon by clicking here!

List Price: $15.00

Amazon Price: $10.20

Click Here To Purchase At Amazon!

Life of Pi Description:

The son of a zookeeper, Pi Patel has an encyclopedic knowledge of animal behavior and a fervent love of stories. When Pi is sixteen, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes.

The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger. Soon the tiger has dispatched all but Pi, whose fear, knowledge, and cunning allow him to coexist with Richard Parker for 227 days while lost at sea. When they finally reach the coast of Mexico, Richard Parker flees to the jungle, never to be seen again. The Japanese authorities who interrogate Pi refuse to believe his story and press him to tell them “the truth.” After hours of coercion, Pi tells a second story, a story much less fantastical, much more conventional–but is it more true?

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #505 in Books
  • Published on: 2003-05-01
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 326 pages

Features

Customer Reviews:

I Once Caught a Bengal Tiger This-s-s-s Big5
With over 1250 reviews already registered for LIFE OF PI, I first thought there could be nothing more to say about this marvelous novel. But after scanning the most recent 100 reviews, I began to wonder what book many of those reviewers had read. Had I relied on 98 of those reviews, I would have expected a far different book than the one I actually read.

Let’s begin with what LIFE OF PI isn’t. It’s not a Man against Nature survival story. It’s not a story about zoos or wild animals or animal husbandry. It’s not ROBINSON CRUSOE or SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON. It’s not a literary version of CASTAWAY or OPEN WATER, and it’s not a “triumph against all odds, happily ever after” rescue story. To classify it as such would be like classifying THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA as a story about a poor fisherman or MOBY DICK as a sea story. Or THE TRIAL as a courtroom drama, THE PLAGUE as a story of an epidemic, HEART OF DARKNESS as a story about slavery, or ANIMAL FARM as an animal adventure.

Martel’s story line is already well-known: a fifteen-year-old boy, the son of a zookeeper in Pondicherry, India survives a shipwreck several days out of Manila. He is the lone human survivor, but his lifeboat is occupied by a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker, an injured zebra, a hyena, and an orangutan. In relatively short order and true Darwinian fashion, their numbers are reduced to just two: the boy Piscene Molitor Patel, and the tiger, Richard Parker. By dint of his zoo exposure and a fortuitously positioned tarpaulin, Pi (as he is called) manages to establish his own territory on the lifeboat and even gains alpha dominance over Richard Parker. At various points in their 227-day ordeal, Pi and the tiger miss being rescued by an oil tanker, meet up with another shipwreck survivor, and discover an extraordinary algae island before finally reaching safety.

When Pi retells the entire story to two representatives of the Japanese Ministry of Transport searching for the cause of the sinking, they express deep disbelief, so he offers them a second, far more mundane but believable story that parallels the first one. They can choose to believe the more fantastical first one despite its seeming irrationality (Pi is, after all, an irrational number) and its necessary leap of faith, or they can accept the second, far more rational version, more heavily grounded in our everyday experiences.

LIFE OF PI is an allegory, the symbolic expression of a deeper meaning through a tale acted out by humans, animals, and in this case, even plant life. Yann Martel has crafted a magnificently unlikely tale involving zoology and botany, religious experience, and ocean survival skills to explore the meaning of stories in our lives, whether they are inspired by religion to explain the purpose of life or generated by our own psyches as a way to understand and interpret the world around us.

Martel employs a number of religious themes and devices to introduce religion as one of mankind’s primary filters for interpreting reality. Pi’s active adoption and participation in Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity establish him as a character able to relate his story through the lens of the world’s three major religions. Prayer and religious references abound, and his adventures bring to mind such Old Testament scenes as the Garden of Eden, Daniel and the lion’s den, the trials of Job, and even Jonah and the whale. Accepting Pi’s survival story as true, without supporting evidence, is little different than accepting New Testament stories about Jesus. They are matters of faith, not empiricism.

In the end, however, LIFE OF PI takes a broader view. All people are storytellers, casting their experiences and even their own life events in story form. Martel’s message is that all humans use stories to process the reality around them, from the stories that comprise history to those that explain the actions and behaviors of our families and friends. We could never process the chaotic stream of events from everyday life without stories to help us categorize and compartmentalize them. Yet we all choose our own stories to accomplish this - some based on faith and religion, some based on empiricism and science. The approach we choose dictates our interpretation of the world around us.

LIFE OF PI bears a faint resemblance to the movie BIG FISH, also a story about storytelling and how we understand and rationalize our own lives through tales both mundane and tall. Martel’s book is structured as a story within a story within a story, planned and executed in precisely 100 chapters as a mathematical counterpoint to the endlessly irrational and nonrepeating value of pi. The book is alternately harrowing and amusing, deeply rational and scientific but wildly mystical and improbable. It is also hugely entertaining and highly readable, as fluid as the water in which Pi floats. Anyone who enjoys literature as a vehicle for contemplating the human condition should find in LIFE OF PI a delicious treat.

Exciting (if gruesome) story in shallow theological waters3
This work of fiction has two distinct aspects, either of which has the potential to be relished for its own sake. On the one hand, it’s a grim adventure story about an adolescent shipwreck survivor. On the other, it’s a fable with overt religious overtones and a Message.

And what a premise for a story! A young boy trapped on a lifeboat with the oddest assort of castaways in literary history: a zebra, hyena, orangutan, and a Bengal tiger. The result is an enjoyable, brisk, nearly believable, often gruesome romp, in straightforward (but never pedestrian) writing style equal to the best “young adult” fiction available today. The first section introduces Pi living in India with his zoo-keeping family. Part horror story, part fable, the major portion of the book recounts his (mis)adventures at sea. It’s the final pages that throw readers for a loop, as the story steers from magic realism to a post-modern finale in which Martel tries to wrap up his point.

While the plot will remind readers of “The Old Man and the Sea,” “Lord of the Flies,” “Robinson Crusoe,” and even “Gulliver’s Travels,” the thematic underpinnings of the book, unfortunately, flirts with the “feel good,” New-Age banality of “Jonathan Livingston Seagull.” Some readers might find the ideas worth contemplating, but I suspect an equal number will realize that Martel’s message disintegrates after serious reflection. These faults deserve discussion, but I will avoid disclosing any of the plot’s surprises.

Some of the book’s metaphysical elements rise to the challenge, especially when Martel approaches the subject with a sense of humor. But the basic argument is rather trite, and the author stumbles when he offers an alternative explanation for Pi’s experiences–a story that is cynical and stark and a lot more realistic–and then challenges the reader to choose: the “better story, the story with animals” or “the story that will confirm what you already know.” Martel’s Big Message: Faith in God is belief in “the better story”; atheism is picking the story you already know, and agnosticism is refusing to choose.

The most obvious flaw in this line of reasoning is that Martel has set up a false dichotomy: believers can choose from hundreds of “possible” stories for any narrative–not just two. The second problem is sheer chutzpah: The “god” of this story is the Author, not God, and its world is entirely the Author’s Creation. There’s no way around the fact that Martel, in effect, compares belief in fiction to belief in God. Furthermore, if we believed in every story because it was better or prettier, many of us would still “believe” in Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy, or Zeus and Hera, or Alice and the Mad Hatter. A third, related issue: since the author invents the story, he is able to manipulate the reader. Another author/god writing this book could easily turn the tables, ending the book with Pi committed to an asylum, unable to care for himself, and uselessly babbling his story to his caretakers. Which is the “better story” then?

And that leads to the novel’s biggest failing: Martel never convinces the reader why it’s important to choose at all. The book is less a brief for belief in God than a denunciation of agnosticism. In press interviews, for example, Martel exposes his own prejudices, referring to agnostics as “doubters” or “fence-sitters,” and that he has greater respect for atheists. Pi argues similarly in the novel, “To choose doubt as a philosophy of life is akin to choosing immobility as a means of transportation.” Yet this metaphor makes no sense: one doesn’t always have to be on the move or even commit to a single mode of transportation. If life presents hundreds of possible stories, why must we choose one (or even a few) to the exclusion of all others? Or, as an agnostic might ask, why not remain open-minded rather than close-minded?

Nevertheless, the reader who finds Martel’s philosophical ramblings unappealing or incoherent or unsatisfying or shallow (or all of the above) can still sit back and take pleasure in the story. For all its theological misfires, “Life of Pi” might yet join a tradition of works (like, say, “The Chronicles of Narnia” or “The Fountainhead”) that stand on their own, regardless of what you might think of their underlying themes.

Definitely Worth A Read4
I passed this book up perhaps dozens of times in the bookstore, before finally relenting. From the description on the back of the dust jacket, it just did not seem like a story that would interest me. Plus, several of the review snippets on the book — essentially praising the author for making a book with such a spare story into a great novel — seemed to me a little like damning with faint praise.

As it turns out, I was half right. I didn’t like the story very much. Well, actually, I very much liked the first hundred pages or so, which took place on land and described our protaganist; a young Indian son-of-a-zookeepper. But I found the story thereafter that took place at sea to be a little too slowly paced for my tastes. And some of the gore — particularly the detailed discussion of the butchering of various sea fish and animals — was too repetitive and, well, gross.

But, it turns out, the story of a boy on a boat with a tiger is not really what the novel is “about” at all. Instead, it’s a novel that uses its backstory to ask a straightforward question: Do we need stories and fables to believe in God? (Spoilers follow.)

At the end of this novel, we are confronted squarely with enduring questions about the limits of faith. How can we believe in God when a wonderful, kind, vegan, pious boy endures tragedy for no good reason? How can that boy continue to believe in God when he witnesses, first hand, how human nature emerges in its cruelest form as 4 castaways on a life boat essentially turn into animals in less than 24 hours. How can he believe in God when he watches helplessly as his mother is brutally murdered for no discernable reason? And how can any of us believe in God when extraordinary measures turn this gentle, pious boy into a murderer himself? Can we find God, this novel asks, solely in the “dry, yeastless, factuality” of this everyday world, where God seemingly refuses to intevene?

The answer, the boy decides, is that we cannot. We need the stories, the fables. So the boy spins a yarn that we are told, “will make you believe in God” — a phrase that seems filled with hope and faith in the book’s first chapter but drenched in irony in its final chapter.

It is interesting to read the other Amazon reviews — many of which are simply outstanding. But it appears that many of you take away from this novel a sense of spirituality and view it as a faith-reaffirming book. I must respectfully disagree. In fact, it is a book that is very pessimistic about faith and about the legends that various faiths use to help themselves believe. Not that it is entirely bleak about faith; as Pi tells us, to ignore or doubt the fables and doubt the existence of God, “is to miss the better story,” and to live a life that, at least in Pi’s view, is hardly worth living. (And Pi practices what he preaches — actively observing multiple faiths even years after his horrible experience.) Still, the final message — that “the story with the animals is better,” and “so it goes with God” is, in some senses, heartbreaking, and hardly faith-affirming.

Still, a novel that makes you think about such things is difficult to criticize merely because its conclusions might be somewhat pessimistic. And if you’re afflicted with the type of mind that likes to continue to mull books over after you’ve put them down, this one will not disappoint.

Or, maybe it’s just a book about a boy and a tiger on a boat, in which case it’s probably not worth reading. (Insert smiley face.)

Amazon.com Review
Yann Martel’s imaginative and unforgettable Life of Pi is a magical reading experience, an endless blue expanse of storytelling about adventure, survival, and ultimately, faith. The precocious son of a zookeeper, 16-year-old Pi Patel is raised in Pondicherry, India, where he tries on various faiths for size, attracting “religions the way a dog attracts fleas.” Planning a move to Canada, his father packs up the family and their menagerie and they hitch a ride on an enormous freighter. After a harrowing shipwreck, Pi finds himself adrift in the Pacific Ocean, trapped on a 26-foot lifeboat with a wounded zebra, a spotted hyena, a seasick orangutan, and a 450-pound Bengal tiger named Richard Parker (”His head was the size and color of the lifebuoy, with teeth”). It sounds like a colorful setup, but these wild beasts don’t burst into song as if co-starring in an anthropomorphized Disney feature. After much gore and infighting, Pi and Richard Parker remain the boat’s sole passengers, drifting for 227 days through shark-infested waters while fighting hunger, the elements, and an overactive imagination. In rich, hallucinatory passages, Pi recounts the harrowing journey as the days blur together, elegantly cataloging the endless passage of time and his struggles to survive: “It is pointless to say that this or that night was the worst of my life. I have so many bad nights to choose from that I’ve made none the champion.”

An award winner in Canada, Life of Pi, Yann Martel’s second novel, should prove to be a breakout book in the U.S. At one point in his journey, Pi recounts, “My greatest wish–other than salvation–was to have a book. A long book with a never-ending story. One that I could read again and again, with new eyes and fresh understanding each time.” It’s safe to say that the fabulous, fablelike Life of Pi is such a book. –Brad Thomas Parsons

From Publishers Weekly
A fabulous romp through an imagination by turns ecstatic, cunning, despairing and resilient, this novel is an impressive achievement “a story that will make you believe in God,” as one character says. The peripatetic Pi (ne the much-taunted Piscine) Patel spends a beguiling boyhood in Pondicherry, India, as the son of a zookeeper. Growing up beside the wild beasts, Pi gathers an encyclopedic knowledge of the animal world. His curious mind also makes the leap from his native Hinduism to Christianity and Islam, all three of which he practices with joyous abandon. In his 16th year, Pi sets sail with his family and some of their menagerie to start a new life in Canada. Halfway to Midway Island, the ship sinks into the Pacific, leaving Pi stranded on a life raft with a hyena, an orangutan, an injured zebra and a 450-pound Bengal tiger named Richard Parker. After the beast dispatches the others, Pi is left to survive for 227 days with his large feline companion on the 26-foot-long raft, using all his knowledge, wits and faith to keep himself alive. The scenes flow together effortlessly, and the sharp observations of the young narrator keep the tale brisk and engaging. Martel’s potentially unbelievable plot line soon demolishes the reader’s defenses, cleverly set up by events of young Pi’s life that almost naturally lead to his biggest ordeal. This richly patterned work, Martel’s second novel, won Canada’s 2001 Hugh MacLennan Prize for Fiction. In it, Martel displays the clever voice and tremendous storytelling skills of an emerging master.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
Named for a swimming pool in Paris the Piscine Molitor “Pi” Patel begins this extraordinary tale as a teenager in India, where his father is a zoo keeper. Deciding to immigrate to Canada, his father sells off most of the zoo animals, electing to bring a few along with the family on their voyage to their new home. But after only a few days out at sea, their rickety vessel encounters a storm. After crew members toss Pi overboard into one of the lifeboats, the ship capsizes. Not long after, to his horror, Pi is joined by Richard Parker, an acquaintance who manages to hoist himself onto the lifeboat from the roiling sea. You would think anyone in Pi’s dire straits would welcome the company, but Richard Parker happens to be a 450-pound Bengal tiger. It is hard to imagine a fate more desperate than Pi’s: “I was alone and orphaned, in the middle of the Pacific, hanging on to an oar, an adult tiger in front of me, sharks beneath me, a storm raging about me.” At first Pi plots to kill Richard Parker. Then he becomes convinced that the tiger’s survival is absolutely essential to his own. In this harrowing yet inspiring tale, Martel demonstrates skills so well honed that the story appears to tell itself without drawing attention to the writing. This second novel by the Spanish-born, award-winning author of Self, who now lives in Canada, is highly recommended for all fiction as well as animal and adventure collections. Edward Cone, New York
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally Sale-$13.57!

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally. Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally

Product: Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally Sale-$13.57!

List Price: $19.95

Amazon Price: $13.57
Click Here To See Amazon Sale Price

Add to cart to see low price@CHADPRODUCTITLE

Availability: In Stock

Usually ships in 24 Hours

Free Shipping Available

Compare Prices on Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally

In October 2003, Patti Digh’s stepfather was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died 37 days later. The timeframe made an impression on her. What emerged was a commitment to ask herself every morning: What would I be doing today if I had only 37 days left to live? The answers changed her life and led to this new kind of book. Part meditation, part how-to guide, part memoir, Life is a Verb is all heart. 

 

Within these pages—enhanced by original artwork and wide, inviting margins ready to be written in—Digh identifies six core practices to jump-start a meaningful life: Say Yes, Trust Yourself, Slow Down, Be Generous, Speak Up, and Love More. Within this framework she supplies 37 edgy, funny, and literary life stories, each followed by a “do it now” 10-minute exercise as well as a practice to try for 37 days—and perhaps the rest of your life.

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #2321 in Books
  • Published on: 2008-08-26
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 240 pages

Features

This book contains a radical thought: Your life is bigger than headline news5
In the beginning, this book really annoyed me.

Here’s the set-up: “In October of 2003, my stepfather was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died 37 days later.”

Tragic. Though I can’t imagine, I can empathize. But then comes the goopy stuff:

“The time frame of 37 days made an impression on me. We often live as if we have all the time in the world, but the definite-ness of 37 days was striking. So short a time, as if all the regrets and joys of a life would barely have time to register before time was up….”

“I tried to reconcile the fact that this fearful death was happening with the understanding that I needed to make something good out of it. What emerged was a commitment to ask myself this question every morning: What would I be doing today if I only had 37 days to live?”

Well, you know the answer. Savor every second. “Enjoy every sandwich,” as the dying Warren Zevon put it. Buddhism 101. The punch line of a million self-help books.

So was I moved by Ms. Digh’s approach to her theoretical last 37 days — pumping out reams of writing so her young daughters would have some idea who Mom was? No. And not because I’m hard-hearted. It’s just that I’ve heard all this. Many times, most recently in “Improv Wisdom”, which I consider the last word on Showing Up and Being Here.

But I stumbled on, past the beautifully designed pages with the lovely art and the super-sincere poems by poets I’d never heard of, until I achieved the entrance to Part One. “Inhabit Your Story.” The predictable moral arrived on schedule: “Find the change you can make and make it.”

On to Part Two: “The Six Practices for Intentional Living.” Which includes: “Dance in your car”, followed by “carry a small grape” and “always rent the red convertible” and “say wow when you see as bus”.

What was I doing in this Birkenstock gulag, surrounded by Good Thoughts?

But then I hit the story of Ms. Digh sitting on a plane next to a boor, and how they became close friends. The next page brought another compelling story. The Jungian analyst Marion Woodman, sick in India, is bothered by a large brown woman who crowds her on the couch of the hotel lobby. For days. On the fourth day, the woman’s husband shows up to say he had been sending his wife there to pour her warmth and life energy into the body of the dying Woodman. The woman had, Woodman decided, saved her life. And then came the story of Digh’s college lover, back in 1978. Richard was African-American. Her parents were less than thrilled. The relationship withered. Flash-cut to now. Richard is now Amanda. He wears his old girlfriend’s earrings.

Tell me enough stories, and one will be an arrow to the heart. Richard-and-Patti was, and then, suddenly, they all were — and advice like “Go to a black barbershop to get your hair cut if you’re a Caucasian” no longer seemed monumentally trite. Reading on, I learned about hikaru dorodango — shiny Japanese mud balls — and how to make better ones simply by making more. I learned how to disagree by saying, elegantly, “I don’t see the truth in that.” I was reminded what a dollar can mean to the person ahead of you in the supermarket line. I encountered some very wise quotations, like this, from Eric Hoffer: “You can discover what your enemy fears by observing the means he uses to frighten you.”

In short, as I read on, I found myself getting sharper and smarter. I considered why it might be better to make a mistake — and learn from it — than strain to get everything right. And I read the obituary Patti Digh wrote recently for her father — who died in 1980, when she was in her teens — and misted over.

The stories in the news these days are so big. Tectonic plates are moving. History is being made. But then, it always is. “Life is a Verb” is a reminder that our lives are bigger than the stories in the headlines. A small thought? Not to me. Now I have to go back to the beginning and start again….

Equal measures Joy, Responsibility5
Inspired by the death of her step-father (and informed by the death of her father), Patti Digh’s book offers advice, nudges, and insistence toward joy and responsibility (not quite the word I want), in equal measure.

With essays like “Dance in Your Car,” “Follow Your Desire Lines,” and “Always Rent the Red Convertible,” Digh urges us to loosen up, take chances, take hold of this “one wild and precious life” (as she quotes Mary Oliver).

But she assumes a life of joy will be a life touched and shaped by other people, and she includes their care in her instruction manual. “Save Face for Someone Else,” and “Wear Pink Glasses” offer models of graceful ways of being with, seeing, and upholding other people. “Love Unloveable People” gently offers each of us a daunting challenge: to respond to what is good in everyone.

Digh doesn’t overlook the challenges of relationship, including our relationship to self. From “Choose Your Seatmates Wisely,” to “Burn those Jeans,” “Don’t Sell Your Red Shoes” and “Say Wow When You See a Bus,” she offers fresh perspectives on familiar situations and straight-jackets of “propriety,” inviting each of us to find a way to be a little more authentic.

The essays alone would be engaging and provocative, as Digh has proven in her blog, 37days. In the book a precious few are arranged to illustrate her six-point guide to a life marked by Intensity, Inclusion, Integrity, Intimacy, Intuition, and Intention. Each is followed by a short exercise to help the reader respond to and integrate the example, and a longer “movement” exercise that readers are invited to take up for 37 days: be alone for 30 minutes every day, write ten letters (in longhand) over the course of 37 days, ask yourself at lunch (for 37 days) “Am I becoming someone I respect?”

Digh suggests we take on that last question at lunch, so that we have the afternoon to save ourselves, if we are failing. It is just this kind of gentle wisdom, this confidence in all of us, that leads me to embrace this book.

Thoughtful Joy5
It makes you think about how to live your life better - not necessarily more organized or efficient or more anything, unless the “more” is some part of your own personal “better”. The writing exercises are excellent, bite-sized, and spur you to much deeper consideration of the topics. And the writing itself is funny, real, down-to-earth and extremely moving. I’ve bought one copy and will buy several more as gifts.

Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome Sale-$10.17!

Wednesday, January 2nd, 2013

Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome. Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome

Product: Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome Sale-$10.17!

List Price: $14.95

Amazon Price: $10.17
Click Here To See Amazon Sale Price

Add to cart to see low price@CHADPRODUCTITLE

Availability: In Stock

Usually ships in 24 Hours

Free Shipping Available

Compare Prices on Adrenal Fatigue: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome

This is an incredibly informative and reader-friendly book about a common debilitating medical condition that goes largely undiagnosed and untreated. ADRENAL FATIGUE: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome is a very empowering work cram-packed with vital information about a condition that very likely affects millions of people.

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #677 in Books
  • Brand: Nutricology
  • Published on: 2002-01-25
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Paperback
  • 358 pages

Features

  • 1 Kits
  • Serving Size:

Incredibly informative and reader-friendly book.5
This is an incredibly informative and reader-friendly book about a common debilitating medical condition that goes largely undiagnosed and untreated. ADRENAL FATIGUE: The 21st Century Stress Syndrome is a very empowering work cram-packed with vital information about a condition that very likely affects millions of people. Author Dr. James L. Wilson gives us both the bad news and the good news about this situation. The bad news is how this illness is devastating so many lives, how so many people are being left without hope, and why traditional (allopathic) medicine has failed to recognize or remedy this tragedy. The good news is that this condition can be diagnosed, can be treated, and that there is hope. And Wilson ought to know. With 3 doctorate and two master�s degrees all from different disciplines (including Human Nutrition, Naturopathic Medicine, and Bio/Nutrition), Wilson lectures extensively to physicians and is an internationally acknowledged expert on alternative, holistic approaches to health. Supporting Wilson�s claims about adrenal fatigue are his 25 years of clinical practice and a depth and breadth of research based on over 2400 scientific references. But don�t be daunted by the academic and scientific pedigree of the author; this book is a very easy read�deceptively so for the quality and import of the material.

The book opens with an overview of the function of the adrenals, and how they are prone to chronic fatigue given our hyper-stressed contemporary lifestyles. This is followed by a section on how to tell if you have adrenal fatigue, which includes a questionnaire, several simple at-home diagnostic tests that you can perform yourself, as well as thorough information on the availability (and usefulness) of different laboratory tests. The heart and soul of Wilson�s book (and where you get a sense of this doctor�s caring �bedside manner�) is the lengthy section on the treatment of adrenal dysfunction, �Helping Yourself Back to Health.� This is the good news section. It includes detailed information and sage advice on multiple strategies for treatment, such as lifestyle, food, food allergies and sensitivities, dietary supplements, adrenal cell extracts, and replacement hormones. This section concludes with a suggested daily program for adrenal recovery, advice on what to expect on your road back to adrenal health, a very helpful list of questions and answers, and even a trouble-shooting guide if you discover that you still need help. The final section of the book is the most scientific; it details the functions of the adrenal glands. This section (as well as the entire book) is supported by helpful�and often entertaining�illustrations.

I discovered through answering the book�s questionnaire and performing two of the self-diagnostic tests that I probably do not suffer from this ailment (although I�ll bet that I have numerous friends who do). I do however suffer from migraine headaches, and since much of the book addresses general wellness, I read on with great interest. Most of Dr. Wilson�s information and advice on lifestyle, food, food allergies and sensitivities (for me, especially this one), and dietary supplements, is material we can all benefit from�the infirm and the healthy among us alike. For the millions of people who do suffer from adrenal fatigue, there are several aspects of the book that I imagine will be most welcome. Foremost will surely be the confirmation that yes, there is something identifiably wrong with you, and the clear beacon of hope for recovery that his program projects. Especially for those readers who are afflicted with adrenal fatigue but are not quite ready to give up on traditional western medicine, Wilson presents a very balanced picture of what you can and cannot expect from your physician, and plenty of good advice for how to negotiate the interface between traditional and alternative healthcare. Lastly, Dr. Wilson has created a website,[URL], that offers updated information and advice, including information on the availability of products and services sure to be of help to sufferers from adrenal fatigue.

Comprehensive, yet very friendly; empowering and very hopeful, this book is certain to help a lot of people.

The Alternative Book on Stress5
The different books on stress on the market offer different visions on the causes of stress and the ways to fight it. Adrenal Fatigue offers a revolutionary different approach saying that the main reason behind stress is the stress of the body’s adrenal glands, two peanut-sized glands on top of each kidney, that are crucial for regulating the body’s temperature, hormones, mood and energy.
The book does not only offer a diagnosis but rather offers a complete lifestyle plan that is supposed to make the body relax and restore its energy. The suggested program is around three months long and includes changing one’s diet by decreasing the intake of junk food and increasing that of organic food and vitamin supplements. The book is also strict on the importance of organizing eating and sleeping hours.
Even though the book suggests an alternative lifestyle that might sound harsh to many, its insight is very relieving for stress sufferers and if those manage to implement half of the book’s suggested plan, they would notice an improvement in their health, restoration in their energy and reduction in their stress levels.
Even though in terms of style the book is sometimes needlessly long and in other times dry and written in a medical style, it offers self-tests as a means of diagnosis and these tests also determine the levels of stress among those who take them.
So far, this is the most convincing, cohesive and well-designed books on stress that brings together alternative medicine, diet and other tips that would certainly help doing away with stress.

At Last - A Doctor Who Knows It’s Not All in My Head!5
When I read this book I laughed and I cried because I finally found something that made sense out of how bad I’ve been feeling for the past few years. I got more practical help and more hope from this book than from all the fruitless visits I’ve made to various specialists. One thing that was great about Dr. Wilson’s book is that it was so clear and easy to read. The illustrations and the anecdotes from his patient files were entertaining and a lot of them touched me personally. This book is like an ideal visit to a trusted doctor who takes the time to help you understand what’s wrong, why it happened, how you can get better and how to prevent it happening again. While reading the book I thought of at least a dozen people I know who have symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue. In fact, when I look around, I think just about every adult and teenager would find something useful in this book. It’s not just about “dealing” with stress, it’s about keeping the stress we all live with from harming us. I hope there are some doctors out there who will read it too.

The 39 Clues Book 4: Beyond the Grave Sale-$9.35!

Tuesday, January 1st, 2013

The 39 Clues Book 4: Beyond the Grave

The 39 Clues Book 4: Beyond the Grave Sale-$9.35!

Compare & Purchase The 39 Clues Book 4: Beyond the Grave at Amazon by clicking here!

List Price: $12.99

Amazon Price: $9.35

Click Here To Purchase At Amazon!

The 39 Clues Book 4: Beyond the Grave Description:

A Clue found in Book 3 sends Amy and Dan jetting off to find out just what’s behind the fierce rivalry between the Tomas and Ekaterina branches of the Cahill family. Was a Clue stolen from the Tomas branch? Where is it now? And most important, can Amy and Dan get their hands on it before their rivals do?

It’s a wild race that will take Amy and Dan deep into the bowels of the earth . . . and right into the hands of the enemy.

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #664 in Books
  • Published on: 2009-06-01
  • Released on: 2009-06-02
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 192 pages

Features

  • ISBN13: 9780545060448
  • Condition: NEW
  • Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark.

Customer Reviews:

Best yet!5
The Cahill siblings are at it again - this time in Egypt. Mysterious clues are hidden in some of the most famous tombs in all of history, but danger still abounds. This time around, though, Dan and Amy have some help from an old friend of Grace Cahill’s - or do they?? This is the best book yet of the series.

The Best Book in the Series Since The Maze of Bones5
“Do not go down to Egypt; live in the land of which I shall tell you.” — Genesis 26:2

In the Bible, Egypt is often used as a symbol that stands for the evil that is in the world. That’s a good reminder of the dangers that Amy and Dan Cahill will encounter when, accompanied by their au pair Nellie Gomez, they seek one of the 39 clues in Egypt.

As I’ve commented on the earlier three books, even if you don’t plan to try to win the contest these books make for fun reading. It’s like a much more exciting version of The Amazing Race with much more at stake.

This story is so delicious that I want to be very careful not to spoil it for you. Compared to the last two books, this one is absolutely super!

Jude Watson makes great use of all the characters to produce drama, introduce plot complications, develop relationships, deepen your understanding of the Cahills, and make you appreciate each character more. Determining what the clue is in this book is also much more difficult than in earlier books which I thought made the story more entertaining. I was especially pleased to see that the story makes good use of the Egyptian setting. In addition, Dan wasn’t nearly so annoying here and Amy’s weaknesses made her more appealing. Even the not-so-trustworthy Cahills are more interesting in this book than in the last two.

As I read the book, I couldn’t help but wonder how Amy and Dan will be able to avoid all of their untrustworthy relatives and deal with the normal dangers of life as they race around the world. I can hardly wait for Book 5!

The book’s main theme is trust. After you finish reading this book, think about who you should trust . . . and about what.

Great new series for middel grade readers4
My Daughter loves these books and looks forward to each new installment. She is a strong reader and goes through book series very quickly. These are fun to read and she can’t wait to get each new book and find more clues.

From School Library Journal
Grade 3–6—In this leg of the worldwide scavenger hunt, Amy and Dan Cahill, accompanied by their au pair Nellie, are off to Egypt to find the next clue left by Ekaterina branch founder Katherine Cahill. Once there, they learn about the rivalry between the Tomas and Ekaterina branches of the Cahill family, discover a secret Ekaterina stronghold at an Egyptian hotel, and explore tombs of ancient Egyptians. They meet their grandmother Grace’s friend Hilary, who gives them several items from Grace. While Hilary and her grandson Theo seem eager to help, looks can be deceiving. Run-ins with Irina Spasky, Jonah Wizard, and Alistair Oh add to the excitement and drama of the adventure. Amy and Dan discover Cahill connections to Napoleon, Thomas Edison, and Marie Curie along with paintings and hieroglyphs that will lead them on their dangerous hunt that’s fraught with betrayals and reversals. Like the previous books, historical information is woven into the fast-paced adventure.—Sarah Polace, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Parma, OH END

About the Author
Jude Watson is the author of the bestselling Star Wars: Last of the Jedi and Jedi Quest books, the most successful licensing series of all time. She lives in Katonah, New York, with her husband and daughter.