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Influencer: The Power to Change Anything Review.

Monday, September 3rd, 2012

Influencer: The Power to Change Anything. Influencer: The Power to Change Anything

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An INFLUENCER motivates others to change.

An INFLUENCER replaces bad behaviors with powerful new skills.

An INFLUENCER makes things happen.

This is what it takes to be an INFLUENCER.

Whether you’re a CEO, a parent, or merely a person who wants to make a difference, you probably wish you had more influence with the people in your life. But most of us stop trying to make change happen because we believe it is too difficult, if not impossible. We develop complicated coping strategies when we should be learning the tools and techniques of the world’s most influential people.

But this is about to change. From the bestselling authors who taught the world how to have Crucial Conversations comes Influencer, a thought-provoking book that combines the remarkable insights of behavioral scientists and business leaders with the astonishing stories of high-powered influencers from all walks of life. You’ll be taught each and every step of the influence process-including robust strategies for making change inevitable in your personal life, your business, and your world. You’ll learn how to:

  • Identify a handful of high-leverage behaviors that lead to rapid and profound change.
  • Apply strategies for changing both thoughts and actions.
  • Marshall six sources of influence to make change inevitable.

Influencer takes you on a fascinating journey from San Francisco to Thailand where you’ll see how seemingly “insignificant” people are making incredibly significant improvements in solving problems others would think impossible. You’ll learn how savvy folks make change not only achievable and sustainable, but inevitable. You’ll discover why some managers have increased productivity repeatedly and significantly-while others have failed miserably.

No matter who you are, or what you do, you’ll never learn a more valuable or important set of principles and skills. Once you tap into the power of influence, you can reach out and help others work smarter, grow faster, live, look, and feel better, even save lives. The sky is the limit…for an Influencer.

Are you an Influencer ?

Find out at www.influencerbook.com

”You don’t have to be a manager to realize that no one likes being told what to do. Yet lectures are still the main way we try to get people to change their behavior. Fortunately, social learning academics have been studying alternatives for decades. Patterson and his fellow consultants have now collected their findings in this engaging, example-rich book. The key message is hardly new, but it has gotten more sophisticated: Managers need to get out of the way and facilitate, not manage, the process of change for employees. They can do this by offering vicarious experiences, restructured environments, peer pressure, and frequent tests-all geared so that people embrace the change as authentic to them, not imposed by an outsider. Missing are only success stories of organizations that persuaded managers to drop their controlling habits and choose to be mere facilitators.”-John T. Landry, Harvard Business Review

  • Amazon Sales Rank: #2143 in Books
  • Published on: 2007-09-13
  • Original language: English
  • Number of items: 1
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • 288 pages

Features

  • ISBN13: 9780071484992
  • Condition: NEW
  • Notes: Brand New from Publisher. No Remainder Mark.

Influenced me!5
The principles in this book have the potential to change the world - by changing behaviors of individuals, families, communities and nations.

The authors teach us how to create the change we’d like to see in the world using a deceptively simple framework (e.g. “Make the Undesirable Desirable” and “Design Rewards and Demand Accountability”). Many of the concepts are intuitive - the problem is that I had never intuited them before, much less put them all together in a framework I could act on. They support the framework with sound theory from behavioral psychology and demonstrate it with real-world examples of people who are solving big, important problems. Throughout it all they use a straight-forward conversational style and a great sense of humor.

But be warned: It’s not a self-help, positive-mental-attitude, quick-fix, rah! rah! book, and it’s not a fast, easy read - it’s not supposed to be. The book deals with powerful concepts and it took me some time to think through the implications and how I could apply them. I re-read some chapters several times and spent time writing out how I could apply the principles (I usually do this in the margins - but with Influencer I ended up using a journal since there was so much to write about).

It’s well worth the time and effort - I’m excited by the results I’m seeing personally as I apply the concepts in my roles as a father, husband, church leader and business leader.

A Brilliant Blueprint of the Science of Change5
When Stephen Covey labeled this new book “an instant classic,” I knew it was a must-read for me.

But I was floored at how brilliant this book really is.

Many books deal with some aspect or particular technique of change in people. Influencer is radically different: it presents a complete structural blueprint of the science of change, and takes you step by step through the critical factors behind change and how to apply them to any problem.

Instead of endless dry facts or empty clichés, Influencer breaks down its major points chapter by chapter, illustrating them with a detailed analysis of several real-world case studies of seemingly insurmountable change problems, including Delancy, a rehab center for hard-core criminal drug addicts which has an astonishing success rate of over 90%. Interspersed are personal and family case studies, research, and history all engagingly written in a well-organized, coherent style. At the end of each chapter is a summary of key concepts covered.

Influencer immediately helped me understand both my own thinking processes toward change and those of others, and jump-started good ideas for both my personal growth and solving several business issues. Influencer is by far the most original and useful book I have read this year. Highly recommended.

Fascinating examples of how to change individual and collective behaviors for the better5
The main thesis of this book is fascinating to contemplate. In essence, it is that nearly all ways used to try to get people to change serious and deeply ingrained behavior such as overeating, drug use, smoking and repeated criminal acts are at best pointless and in many cases counterproductive. You learn of examples of organizations that have found ways to cure people of these behaviors where the methods are really not that complicated. No massive amounts of money are expended, no high political rhetoric and no great national political mission is cited as a motive.
The examples are interesting and include:

*) The international effort to eliminate the guinea worm parasite, a terrible disease where people ingest the larva of the worm. Once the worm reaches adulthood, it literally bores its way out of the body and deposits its eggs.
*) The effort to get sex workers in Thailand to insist that their clients wear condoms during sex, thereby preventing millions of new cases of HIV infection.
*) The effort to get hospitals to recognize that approximately 100,000 people die in the United States each year in diseases caused in part by their hospital stay. Once the problem was recognized, take realistic and effective steps to prevent them.
*) An organization in San Francisco with an amazing record of turning people with extensive criminal records and a history of drug use into productive and valuable citizens.

In reading this book, you are struck with how simple these solutions are. It is also clear why so many government programs such as “the war on drugs” are so ineffective. They are efforts based on the political flavor of the moment and few in power seem willing to consider counterintuitive solutions that involve political risk.
This is a book that contains a great deal of material that would be valuable to counselors, community agencies, dieters and people in human resources. Anyone who deals with behaviors that can damage the individual and society should read it.